Double breaker question

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  #1  
Old 02-23-10, 10:22 PM
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Double breaker question

Does a breaker that takes up two places on the panel mean that line is 240V?

I have five such 'double breakers'. One is for the stove, one for a lone plug in the laundry room, and three for lone plugs in my kitchen. There are no special markings on these plugs.

Thanks,

Fed
 
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  #2  
Old 02-23-10, 11:08 PM
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It can also be for a MWBC or MultiWire Branch Circuit which would be two separate 120 volt circuits with a shared neutral.

The tie bar is for safety so you must turn off both circuits before servicing.
 
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Old 02-24-10, 04:27 AM
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I re-mapped the panel by turning them off and finding out which outlets, etc belonged to which breaker. It seems that these double breakers belong to only one recepticle each.

Are you saying that each plug on each recepticle (that has a double breaker) has is own circuit?
 
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Old 02-24-10, 05:01 AM
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IIRC the CEC required the kitchen receptacles to be split wired off a multi-wire branch circuit. The top plug was one circuit and the bottom was another circuit.
 
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Old 02-24-10, 05:27 AM
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I understand now.

I guess the same thing in the laundry room recepticle.

So, can I change the laundry room recepticle to a 240v plug?
 
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Old 02-24-10, 06:57 AM
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What ampacity 240 volt receptacle do you need? Does this match the breaker rating that is already installed?

If you need a higher rating than what is installed you will need a larger cable installed.
 
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Old 02-24-10, 07:55 AM
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It is for a drier.

There is no amp rating written on the common trip breaker.
 
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Old 02-24-10, 08:54 AM
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In the US the most common circuit size for a dryer is 30 amps @ 240, wired with #10.

A new installation would be wired with 2 hots, 1 neutral, and one ground. Older installations used 3 wires.
 
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Old 02-24-10, 09:21 AM
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If you changed it to 240v what would you plug the washing machine into?
 
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Old 02-24-10, 11:03 AM
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The wire is NMD90.
The wire has a black, red, white, and a bare copper wire.

The panel is 125 amps.

There is another 120V plug for the washing machine.

So, do you think it is possible?
 
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Old 02-24-10, 11:11 AM
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What ampacity does the dryer require and what size is the current breaker or wire size?
 
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Old 02-24-10, 11:47 AM
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This is the drier
DV339AEG/XAC DV339AEG/XAC Samsung - Dryers - Products Tasco Appliances Kitchen Cooking Laundry BBQ Ontario Canada

It doesn't state the amp requirement. It does note 5300 watts elsewhere, if that helps.

The wire is The wire is NMD90.
NMD90 - ECS - Electrical Cable Supply
The wire has a black, red, white, and a bare copper wire.
 
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Old 02-24-10, 12:15 PM
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Your dryer needs a 30 amp 240 volt circuit.

You need to find a size like NM-D 12-2 w G or something similar to determine the size or look at the breaker handle for the circuit size.
 
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Old 02-24-10, 12:23 PM
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I see.

The breaker handle says 15.

I guess that would need to be changed.

Is the wire acceptable, or does a larger wire need to me run?
 
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Old 02-24-10, 01:02 PM
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If you can't find a size then go to the hardware store. Buy 1 foot of #14 THWN and 1 foot of #10 THWN. Strip off an inch or two of insulation and compare the size of the stripped wire to the stripped end of the wire in the breaker box.

A 15 amp breaker normally has a #14 wire. You need #10 on a 2pole breaker.
There is another 120V plug for the washing machine
That may be a part of a MWBC that is supplied by that circuit. Any attempt to reuse this circuit in that case might kill that receptacle. Best to just run a new circuit for the dryer.
 
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Old 02-24-10, 01:09 PM
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Thank you very much. I'll give it a try.
 
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