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Inspector requiring AFCI and Tamper Resistant Outlets in existing construction??

Inspector requiring AFCI and Tamper Resistant Outlets in existing construction??

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  #1  
Old 02-26-10, 04:41 PM
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Question Inspector requiring AFCI and Tamper Resistant Outlets in existing construction??

So I got in contact with an inspector today for some questions regarding what they would want to see with my job (various work from replacing existing outlets to adding a new circuit). My town has no electrical inspector and just requires that a U.C.C.-certified inspector be used. He answered my question, but also threw a line that AFCIs are required for new circuits other than kitchens, bathrooms, laundry rooms, garages and unfinished attics and basements. Also, he stated that all new receptacles installed in dwellings must be tamper resistant type. I know that both statements are accurate for new construction, but it was not my understanding that every new outlet being installed must be tamper resistant and that any new circuit must be AFCI. None of this work is part of an addition or complete room remodel that might be considered new construction. I'm actually more frustrated by the tamper resistant outlets than the AFCI since I have already replaced many of the outlets and bought high quality, self-grounding non-tamper resistant outlets which I now can't return. I did this since I had not seen anywhere that new outlets in existing construction needed to be tamper resistant. Also, two of the receptacles on a new circuit branch were installed by a professional electrician.

Is the inspector correct, wrong, or is it up to interpretation (and therefore his opinion goes...)?
 
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Old 02-26-10, 05:05 PM
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The inspector is correct. ANY new work, even in an existing structure, is considered new construction. He did not request that you replace any existing receptacles or circuit breakers did he?
 
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Old 02-26-10, 05:38 PM
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Originally Posted by furd View Post
He did not request that you replace any existing receptacles or circuit breakers did he?
No he didn't. Just that all outlets (including the existing outlets I'm just swapping) be replaced with tamper resistant outlets.

Originally Posted by furd View Post
ANY new work, even in an existing structure, is considered new construction.
I can understand that for the new circuits I'm running or extensions of existing circuits, but (and I don't mean this argumentatively/sarcastic) why do the non-tamper resistant outlets even exist if every new outlet being installed should be tamper resistant? I'm answering my own question in that some areas might not have adopted the 2008 NEC, but still the overwhelming majority being sold are not tamper-resistant.


Do GFCI outlets in kitchens, bathrooms, unfinished basements, and outdoors need to be tamper resistant as well?
 
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Old 02-26-10, 06:03 PM
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Generally speaking replacements can be like-for-like but it is possible that you have local amendments to the National code that requires all replacement receptacles in residences be tamper resistant. I don't think that receptacles in non-residential occupancies are required to have the tamper resistant receptacles.

Also, just because the local mega mart homecenter sells something it does not necessarily follow that everything they sell is legal to be installed in any particular jurisdiction.
 
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Old 02-26-10, 06:04 PM
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You say your town has no inspector, but surely your town has codes. What version of the NEC has your town adopted?
 
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Old 02-26-10, 06:28 PM
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Which county are you in? Curious since I just had my main panel replaced and inspected and he never looked at anything but the panel. Also didn't require ARC fault breakers. I'm in Bucks.
 
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Old 02-26-10, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by CasualJoe View Post
What version of the NEC has your town adopted?
I admittedly should, but don't know the answer to that question. However, ik I'm interpreting the following from this PA state site correctly, the state requires 2008 NEC:

The UCC Administration and Enforcement regulation has adopted the following codes for use throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, effective 12/31/2009:

Chapter 27 (Electrical) requires that all electrical components, equipment and systems in buildings and structures covered by the IBC comply with the requirements of NFPA 70-2008, National Electric Code.
 
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Old 02-26-10, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by bob22 View Post
Which county are you in? Curious since I just had my main panel replaced and inspected and he never looked at anything but the panel. Also didn't require ARC fault breakers. I'm in Bucks.
If all you did was replace the panel, there was no need for the inspector to look anywhere else. Newbie is doing other work throughout his home which is considered new work and will have to conform to the code in force.
 
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Old 02-26-10, 07:58 PM
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In my area tamper resistant receptacles and AFCI would not be required if you simply swapped old for new without modifying the circuit wiring. The TRs and AFCI would be required if it was a new circuit in an existing room or the circuit was extended, re-routed or similar modification of the wiring in the wall.

why do the non-tamper resistant outlets even exist if every new outlet being installed should be tamper resistant?
TR is not required for non-living areas nor are they required for most commercial areas except schools, child-care and medical facilities which cater primarily to children.
 
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Old 03-01-10, 11:56 AM
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Just finished up the wiring on the log home I'm building. Thank God my area has not adopted NEC 2008 - those AFCIs are expensive.
 
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Old 03-01-10, 07:34 PM
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The 2005 NEC also requires AFCIs in some areas. What code are you building to?
 
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Old 03-03-10, 09:53 AM
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I'm under NEC 2005. I do have AFCIs for the bedroom circuits, but nothing else.
 
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