New Meter Socket and Wire

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  #1  
Old 03-10-10, 10:13 PM
fubar2578's Avatar
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New Meter Socket and Wire

Hi All,

I had the neutral wire coming into the house go bad last night. Power company says I need a new meter socket and that it needs to be moved to meet code. This is ok by me the current setup was a mess. He verified that I have 200 amp service. After a trip to the inspectors office I know that I can do the work and the permit fee is paid.

I have about a 60 foot run to get to the breaker panel. Therefore a means of disconnect is required. I'm going to go with a combination meter socket /breaker panel to meet this requirement and to avoid having to add a breaker panel right next to the meter like I have currently to feed the garage and air conditioner and house.

The new feed to the panel in the basement will be in conduit extending around the side of the house through the garage and to the basement as the back of the house is a concrete slab addition. Ok. I know this needs to be a four wire feed.
100 amp going with 2 awg hot hot neutral and 6 awg ground for the panel feed. Do I need to provide a seperate 4 awg ground wire through this conduit to bond the incoming water line to the service? If yes. Does it have to be continuous or can it be split and attached at the ground bar in the sub panel?
 
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Old 03-11-10, 10:21 AM
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So you're asking if you can run the #4 grounding electrode conductor (GEC) from the new main panel through the conduit to the house subpanel, then out from the subpanel to the water main?

I can't think of a reason that would not be allowed. In fact, you might even be able to use that instead of the #6 equipment ground. I would give your inspector a call before doing it because it's a non-standard installation, but I can't think of any code article that prohibits it. Usually the GEC must be continuous, but there is an exception that allows it to be spliced either by welding or on a solid bus bar. The ground bar of the subpanel should qualify for that exception.

You'll also need two additional ground rods driven out by the new panel, 6' apart and connected to the main panel ground bus with #6 (or larger) copper.

The rest of the plan sounds good to me. The new part of your service that's 200A (meter/main and up) should be #2/0 copper hots+neutral in 2" rigid pipe.
 
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Old 03-11-10, 11:39 AM
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Art 250.134 , Equiptment connected by a Permanent Wiring Method - Grounding reads--

"Unless Grounded by connection to the Grounded Circuit Conductor as permitted ----
non current-carrying metal parts of equiptment , raceways , and enclosures shall be connected to an Equipment Grounding Conductor ---- "

An inspector may cite this as requiring a specfic type of conductor with a distinct identity (EGC) . as compared to a distinctly different type of conductor specifically indentified as a Grounding Electrode Conductor.
 
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Old 03-11-10, 12:01 PM
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Something else to perhaps consider: How far do you have to move the meter socket? In my case, the feed from the pole to my meter is about 125 feet and it's underground. When I had my electrical rough-in inspection I was told the meter had to be moved as it was too close to a window. On further investigation the POCO determined if the meter was moved to where the inspector wanted it (about 20 feet away), they would have to pull bigger underground cables. Magically, my meter was suddenly OK where it was (and still is).
 
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Old 03-11-10, 07:36 PM
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Typically, the meter location is determined by the power company and not the inspector.
 
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Old 03-11-10, 07:40 PM
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I know this needs to be a four wire feed. 100 amp going with 2 awg hot hot neutral and 6 awg ground for the panel feed
If you are using copper, you can use #3 instead of the #2.
 
 

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