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Is there limit on number of downstream receptacles on load side of GFCI?

Is there limit on number of downstream receptacles on load side of GFCI?

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Old 04-01-10, 09:56 AM
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Is there limit on number of downstream receptacles on load side of GFCI?

using 12/3 for 2 SABC in kitchen. go to junction box in crawlspace where I split the neutral and run the two circuits using two 12/2 cables up to two wall receptacles in kitchen. these will have GFCI receptacles. then I planned on connecting the counter receptacles to the load side, alternating circuits on counter in kitchen and pantry. so I would have 5 receptacles downstream of each of the GFCI. I can't seem to find a restriction, but my dad said that when he did wiring for employer, they were limited to 3 downstream receptacles per GFCI. this was in a computer room so not sure if that had anything to do with it?
 
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Old 04-01-10, 10:04 AM
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There is no limit on the number of receptacles. Some GFCIs can get fussy when there is a long cable length downstream, but that isn't a problem in a single room.
 
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Old 04-01-10, 10:16 AM
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this was in a computer room so not sure if that had anything to do with it
Possibly to limit the number of servers that would go down if there was a fault.
 
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Old 04-01-10, 10:57 AM
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thanks for the quick response. he had me worried when he asked how many I could put on each GFCI and I was stumped cause I didn't know of limit. I did know about the distance issue. I will have to ask about the computers. He worked for school district and I think it was just computers for kids, not any servers. I will have to try to see exactly why he was limited to 3?
 
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Old 04-01-10, 11:24 AM
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That could have just been a load issue -- 4 duplex receptacles restricts the number of PCs to about 8 you could potentially connect to a 15A or 20A circuit. At 200W each that puts you in the operational range of a 15A circuit.
 
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Old 04-01-10, 07:00 PM
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I am not sure about the "code" or "article" here on this but, I was always told no more than 3. Three ohh three is the magic number... If your putting more than 3 duplexes on GFI protected circuit your just cheap.. Sorry..!Beer 4U2
 
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Old 04-01-10, 08:16 PM
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When you use a GFCI breaker are you limited to three outlets?

What's so different about a GFCI outlet?

The practical limit of the number outlets will be reached by the breaker rating well before being dictated by the monitering limits of a GFCI device. No?
 

Last edited by mickblock; 04-01-10 at 08:31 PM.
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Old 04-01-10, 10:45 PM
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cheap? come see how I have rewired my addition (practically re-doing whole house) and you definitely would not say it is a cheap job. I have 10 duplex receptacles on the kitchen counter (it is only 24' of total countertop) and that 12/3 cable also supplies 2 receptacles on the wall ( one kitchen wall and one pantry wall) and 2 on pantry counter top (will be GFCI receptacles on pantry countertop also) and I have separate MWBC for the frig/micro, separate MWBC for the disposal/dishwasher, separate circuit for the kitchen lighting, upped the wiring on double wall oven and cooktop to 6/3 for each in case need more power for future. (that is 9 circuits in kitchen). I ran two 20 amp circuits for bath counter, 1 for tub pump, 1 for tub heater, one for a wall heater and one for lights. (that is 6 circuits in master bath!) so it was not a cheap decision.

a consideration was aesthetics for sure. I have each leg of the 12/3 going to one of the wall outlets which will have the GFCI's. then they go to alternating receptacles on kitchen countertop. So there are no GFCI's on the countertop but they are protected. If you throw a GFCI here but not there it would not look as nice as my setup and as easy to understand what is controlling what. believe me, not wanting to put out an extra $30 for two more GFCI receptacles was not the reason. call me anal, but I wanted it to look good.

can you point me to any literature that says to use only 3 downstream? I have 3 books and none mentioned it. I think they did mention about the length of run can have effect on false trips. but nothing about number of receptacles.
 
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Old 04-01-10, 11:01 PM
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Originally Posted by hammerash View Post
cheap? come see how I have rewired my addition (practically re-doing whole house) and you definitely would not say it is a cheap job. I have 10 duplex receptacles on the kitchen counter (it is only 24' of total countertop) and that 12/3 cable also supplies 2 receptacles on the wall ( one kitchen wall and one pantry wall) and 2 on pantry counter top (will be GFCI receptacles on pantry countertop also) and I have separate MWBC for the frig/micro, separate MWBC for the disposal/dishwasher, separate circuit for the kitchen lighting, upped the wiring on double wall oven and cooktop to 6/3 for each in case need more power for future. (that is 9 circuits in kitchen). I ran two 20 amp circuits for bath counter, 1 for tub pump, 1 for tub heater, one for a wall heater and one for lights. (that is 6 circuits in master bath!) so it was not a cheap decision.

a consideration was aesthetics for sure. I have each leg of the 12/3 going to one of the wall outlets which will have the GFCI's. then they go to alternating receptacles on kitchen countertop. So there are no GFCI's on the countertop but they are protected. If you throw a GFCI here but not there it would not look as nice as my setup and as easy to understand what is controlling what. believe me, not wanting to put out an extra $30 for two more GFCI receptacles was not the reason. call me anal, but I wanted it to look good.

can you point me to any literature that says to use only 3 downstream? I have 3 books and none mentioned it. I think they did mention about the length of run can have effect on false trips. but nothing about number of receptacles.
I dont know any literature that supports it, i guess it just comes down to work ethics. I personally have never put more than 3 devices downstream on a GFI.
 
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Old 04-01-10, 11:15 PM
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Basically there is no limit for the numbers of receptales downstream of GFCI at all but there is a gotcha is the distance but due this is in a room so it will not be a issue at all.

For myself I useally limited to 4 to 6 depending on what on that circuit.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 04-02-10, 12:03 AM
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I started to reply to a post-but that post disappeared? anyway here is a reply to that post.

I am pretty sure (from books and previous posts on this forum) that you can have the SABC on the kitchen wall as well. if you saw my layout, you would know that those receptcles are on wall solely to meet code that need receptcles on wall greater than 2'-I can't really see them being used. If it were't code mandated I probably wouldn't have even put them in. but since I did, I thought it was perfect place for the GFCI's.

there was comment that most kitchens are 10 circuits--remember, this is an addition. My kitchen is in same place that it was before with addition all around it. I could have gotten by with wiring that was in place since I did not have to bring the kitchen up to current code. I was putting in new cabinets, but I could have left old ones in place till after inspections and then replaced them and wouldn't had to worry about elecric in kitchen. but I gutted the kitchen instead and did away with ALL the wiring. elsewhere in house I found an in wall splice (hidden junction box in wall), there was bx with insulation crumbling, old NM with undersized ground, and someone decided to share a neutral in one circuit with the neutral in another when one went bad-and both breakers were on same leg in panel! so for safety I replaced EVERYTHING. and once I get few things done, I will have almost completely rewired entire house. only about 3 circuits left to get them all. so the point is, I have not done anything cheaply regarding wiring-for both safety and functionality reasons. not sure what else was in that post that disappeared?

OK back to new post-what work ethics are you talking about electricjoeNJ? I mean if there isn't anything to say you shouldn't do it (I haven't seen anything and you even stated that you don't know of any literature) and there isn't anything in code, or in manufacturers install instructions, or in the books I have read, and many have commented that there is no problem with putting more than 3 downstream, why are you saying it is not good work ethics to put more than 3? I mean you have to have something to justify that statement. some others also said only to put three, but no one has given a reason. like for the problem with distance-I read that current leak could cause this problem of false tripping in long distance between GFCI and downstream receptacle. but I haven't seen anything to suggest issue with putting more than 3 if the distance is not great. theoretically, I can't see any issue with it? like someone said, do you limit receptacles on a GFCI breaker? if not, then why do you on GFCI receptacle?
 
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Old 04-02-10, 01:32 AM
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For me I picked 3 because its a magic number! Also If the GFI trips it want take out a arsenal of receptacles. It usually works out for me than I never need more than 3 anyhow and it also depends on what is going to be used in that receptacle that may cause a "nuisance tripping" that I like to avoid. Other than that code, right, reason, or whatever I dont know. That is just how I roll. If 10 works for you then use ten. Your kitchen sounds lovely.Beer 4U2
 
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Old 04-02-10, 11:31 PM
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Originally Posted by hammerash View Post
I started to reply to a post-but that post disappeared? anyway here is a reply to that post.

I am pretty sure (from books and previous posts on this forum) that you can have the SABC on the kitchen wall as well. if you saw my layout, you would know that those receptcles are on wall solely to meet code that need receptcles on wall greater than 2'-I can't really see them being used. If it were't code mandated I probably wouldn't have even put them in. but since I did, I thought it was perfect place for the GFCI's.

there was comment that most kitchens are 10 circuits--remember, this is an addition. My kitchen is in same place that it was before with addition all around it. I could have gotten by with wiring that was in place since I did not have to bring the kitchen up to current code. I was putting in new cabinets, but I could have left old ones in place till after inspections and then replaced them and wouldn't had to worry about elecric in kitchen. but I gutted the kitchen instead and did away with ALL the wiring. elsewhere in house I found an in wall splice (hidden junction box in wall), there was bx with insulation crumbling, old NM with undersized ground, and someone decided to share a neutral in one circuit with the neutral in another when one went bad-and both breakers were on same leg in panel! so for safety I replaced EVERYTHING. and once I get few things done, I will have almost completely rewired entire house. only about 3 circuits left to get them all. so the point is, I have not done anything cheaply regarding wiring-for both safety and functionality reasons. not sure what else was in that post that disappeared?

OK back to new post-what work ethics are you talking about electricjoeNJ? I mean if there isn't anything to say you shouldn't do it (I haven't seen anything and you even stated that you don't know of any literature) and there isn't anything in code, or in manufacturers install instructions, or in the books I have read, and many have commented that there is no problem with putting more than 3 downstream, why are you saying it is not good work ethics to put more than 3? I mean you have to have something to justify that statement. some others also said only to put three, but no one has given a reason. like for the problem with distance-I read that current leak could cause this problem of false tripping in long distance between GFCI and downstream receptacle. but I haven't seen anything to suggest issue with putting more than 3 if the distance is not great. theoretically, I can't see any issue with it? like someone said, do you limit receptacles on a GFCI breaker? if not, then why do you on GFCI receptacle?
The post disappeared becuase i edited it. I had checked my code book after i posted it and realized my error . What i mean by work ethics i guess is just everyones own personal opinion. We all have our ways of doing things, i personally dont do more than 3 devices. That is also becuase i limit my SABC to no more than 4 devices each. yes, it leads to more circuts, but it ensures a zero trip house. My goal, which is my work ethic is to have zero trips caused by overloads.. Hope this helps clarify things.
 
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Old 04-06-10, 07:05 PM
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sorry didn't reply sooner but have been working hard hoping for inspection this week. anyway, let me say I'm sorry for jumping on you guys. when someone said cheap it kinda set me off. construction on my addition started sept 2006! yes you got that right 2006. my general contractor built foundation too high, had to rip off all framing that was done, and then after several months of zero work went bankrupt. so I was out tons of money and with a foundation that was too high. I eventually hired a new contractor to build shell of addition and I took over from there. have hired subs, did a lot of work myself and doing all electric myself. this addition has cost me a fortune-I know cause I have detailed records for my attorney in my arbitration case. so when someone says cheap it set me off.

anyway, electric joe, I can understand the 4 receptacle limit. but that doesn't really have to do with any limitation of GFCI receptacles and really has to do with your no trip ethic. funny, my old kitchen was wired crazy with the frig on same circuit as what ended up being my toaster oven. the dishwasher on same circuit as the disposal and microwave along with another recep on counter! then had another circuit that didn't really have anything on it but coffee maker. and believe it or not, I never had a breaker trip. but after looking at some things-1400 watt for toaster oven 1300 watt for coffee machine-I can see where tripping could be problem if not planned out right. heck, I have frig, disposal, dishwasher, micro all on dedicated circuits so that leaves 2 circuit entirely just for SA on counter(remember I said the two wall receptacles are not in place where they will really get used-you would trip on cord if you had something plugged in). so have to be careful not to put toaster oven and coffee maker on same circuit and turn on at same time! the dedicated 20 for frig is probably wasted. I think it it only 9A and that would only be when compressor is on. I do have dining room that is right next to the kitchen (kinda part of kitchen with like 8' wide walkway between them) and I have dedicated 20amp circuit for receptacles in there so if have party or something and need to plug in say slow cookers to keep things warm, I could put some on that circuit also. so how many circuits do you have dedicated entirely to counter for a kitchen my size--I think I said like 24' of counter.

now, what things are likely to cause nuisance tripping silver tattoo? some SA in my kitchen would be toaster oven, cofffee machine, bread making machine. my old kitchen did NOT have GFCI in kitchen!

thanks. and again, I apologize for going off.
 
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Old 04-06-10, 08:01 PM
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now, what things are likely to cause nuisance tripping silver tattoo? some SA in my kitchen would be toaster oven, cofffee machine, bread making machine. my old kitchen did NOT have GFCI in kitchen!

Because that is what a GFCI is designed to do. And the more load you have on, the more it will detect a load difference and kill that circuit.

The dishwasher and garbage disposal are on a the same 20amp circuit, 120-volt circuit and the microwave and refrigerator I would make dedicated and be supported by their own individual 20-amp circuit. Though this may not be "code", it is in my opinion a more reliable and "nuisance free" way to do it. The other things you mentioned would be another circuit protected by a GFCI . That is 4 circuits right there not including lights. So 5-6 circuits should be fine for this kitchen. We are all subject to do things differently, this is how I would would do it.
 
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Old 04-06-10, 10:07 PM
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Originally Posted by SilverTattoo View Post
Because that is what a GFCI is designed to do. And the more load you have on, the more it will detect a load difference and kill that circuit.

That is an incorrect statement.the function of a GFI has absolutly nothing to do with how much load is on it. It trips becuase there is an imbalance between the hot and neutral conductors. If it had anything to do with loads, then GFCI's would be limited to one device per, with no load protection.

How GFCIs Work
 
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Old 04-06-10, 10:37 PM
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It trips becuase there is an imbalance between the hot and neutral conductors
No No. You are not understanding what I am saying right. What I am saying is the more you have on it as in Load(with more appliances on that circuit) the more likely it will be to find a loss or imbalance and will trip.

P.S. I appologize if the "cheap" comment set you off. To be totally honest with you I first though I read u had 10 duplexs on that GFI, now I see you have 5 which is not to bad pending on what you got on them. I was just always taught to use 3 myself and given reasons why. To better answer your question maybe ElectricJoe can better assist you because apparently I dont know how a GFI works..

1 other thing on that last circuit you got to remember you want be running all that stuff at one time. Maybe the toaster oven ruffly (12amp) and the coffee maker ruffly (11amps). I use my toaster and coffee maker at the same time but not the toaster oven and coffee maker. This is true for any circuit though. You have to pay attention to what you are using on it. Just like a vacuum cleaner taking out a living room etc. If you got a spare circuit, what the hell, separate the two. Though another thing I dont get what if you move out or forget which receptacle is which.. Are you going to label the covers , Toaster, Microwave, etc, etc, LoL.. I think this is becoming something that has been over analyzed way to much. It sounds good to me the way you got it in my opinion.
Good luck
 

Last edited by SilverTattoo; 04-06-10 at 11:25 PM. Reason: i wanted to add something.
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Old 04-07-10, 12:21 AM
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silver tatto, maybe you misunderstood. my OLD kitchen had things like in my last post. For new kitchen I ran a 20A MWBC for frig/micro, another 20A MWBC for dishwasher/disposal, and a third 20A MWBC for the 2 SABC. so that is 6 circuits plus lights, plus double wall oven, plus cooktop. and another 20A supplying only receptacles in dining room off kitchen. anyway, I get your point that this should be fine. you're right, any circuit can easily be overloaded if you don't think about what you are plugging into it.
 
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Old 04-07-10, 11:31 AM
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silver tatto, maybe you misunderstood
Its very possible, and it wouldnt be the 1st time. In these forum something I have noticed is things can get mixed up or misread real quick and its harder to explain everything through typing vrs say a verbal conversation. I try to help and can only explain things to a certain degree and I may be explaining them wrong sometimes also, but I try to be as accurate as possible.

With that being said..
For new kitchen I ran a 20A MWBC for frig/micro, another 20A MWBC for dishwasher/disposal, and a third 20A MWBC for the 2 SABC
I fore sure would not of put the fridge and microwave on the same circuit.. I would of dedicated both of these appliances. Im not 100% on the code issue but, this is how I would of done it. The dishwasher and disposal sound good to me and 2 circuits for small appliances sound good to me.

I really think the microwave and fridge was a bad idea. You may want to get a 2nd opinion but, all electricians I have worked for/with dedicate those two including myself.
 
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Old 04-07-10, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by SilverTattoo View Post
Its very possible, and it wouldnt be the 1st time. In these forum something I have noticed is things can get mixed up or misread real quick and its harder to explain everything through typing vrs say a verbal conversation. I try to help and can only explain things to a certain degree and I may be explaining them wrong sometimes also, but I try to be as accurate as possible.

With that being said..


I fore sure would not of put the fridge and microwave on the same circuit.. I would of dedicated both of these appliances. Im not 100% on the code issue but, this is how I would of done it. The dishwasher and disposal sound good to me and 2 circuits for small appliances sound good to me.

I really think the microwave and fridge was a bad idea. You may want to get a 2nd opinion but, all electricians I have worked for/with dedicate those two including myself.
I dont think hes running those on the same circut. He ran 20amp MWBC, multi wire branch circuts, which i understand as being 12/3 wires.
 
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Old 04-07-10, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by SilverTattoo View Post
Its very possible, and it wouldnt be the 1st time. In these forum something I have noticed is things can get mixed up or misread real quick and its harder to explain everything through typing vrs say a verbal conversation. I try to help and can only explain things to a certain degree and I may be explaining them wrong sometimes also, but I try to be as accurate as possible.

With that being said..


I fore sure would not of put the fridge and microwave on the same circuit.. I would of dedicated both of these appliances. Im not 100% on the code issue but, this is how I would of done it. The dishwasher and disposal sound good to me and 2 circuits for small appliances sound good to me.

I really think the microwave and fridge was a bad idea. You may want to get a 2nd opinion but, all electricians I have worked for/with dedicate those two including myself.
I believe he has the fridge & microwave on a seperate circuit(MWBC) is 2 circuits. Microwave now needs a GFCI. Dishwasher & disposal on a MWBC ( 2circuits ) and his counters on a MWBC ( 2 circuits ). The thing I like doing on the counters is lets stay you have 6 receptacles on the counter space area and 2 circuits for them. I would wire up #1,3 & 5 on a circuit & 2,4 & 6 on the other circuit. So if you might have your coffee maker & toaster together on the counter they would be plugged in a different circuit. It looks good to me.

Jim

Beer 4U2
 
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Old 04-07-10, 12:35 PM
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you're correct electric joe, I ran three 20A MWBC with 12/3 wire.

1. one leg for frig, one leg for micro
2. one leg for dishwasher, one leg for disposal
3. one leg for SABC#1, one leg for SABC#2

then throw in circuit for cooktop, one for double wall ovens and one for lights.

I was dedicating a 15A for lights in kitchen, but adding everything up, looks like I will only be max out at 1025W, which seems really low and lot of wasted available watts. I was shooting for around 1400-1500 total watts on the lighting circuits. I know you don't have to follow 80% rule for these since not continuous use, but I just like to leave some room on them. but 1025 is pretty low usage of that circuit. I have over range micro so that supplies the light/fan over cooktop and that is off the 20A micro circuit. thought about running this to another area for my later rewiring of what is left to re-do in old house (not much). or would you leave as is?

oh, just got your post rukkus. yes I did alternate the circuits on counter just as you mention-circuit 1=1,3,5,7,9 circuit 2=2,4,6,8,10- so any receptacle has the receptacles beside it on different circuit.
 
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Old 04-07-10, 10:08 PM
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Ahh well this is a good example of exactly what I was talking about below LOL.. MWBC must = muilt wire branch circuit which Im not used to that terminology yet. I know it as 12/3, 12/2 etc.

But now I see what he is saying and it makes sense. Seems I need to learn the DIY lingo.


Though with that being said. If the micro and the fridge are sharing a neutral and the gfci trips, down does the fridge also.. Technically they aren't dedicated, just a multiwire circuit.

P.S. If you hit the fridge 1st with the 12/3 then ran from that jbox to GFCI with 12/2 on the other circuit to line, this would totally work. If you hit the GFI 1st can ran the fridge off the load side of GFCI, this = not a good idea in my opinion. (also pigtail all the joint.)

Beer 4U
 

Last edited by SilverTattoo; 04-07-10 at 10:51 PM. Reason: because I had to think on it for a min.
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Old 04-08-10, 12:22 AM
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I was doing some research on Multiwire Branch circuits and found this to be very interesting.. Thoughts??

Electriciansparadise -- Multiwire Branch Circuits
 
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Old 04-08-10, 07:36 AM
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Good Find.

Originally Posted by SilverTattoo View Post
I was doing some research on Multiwire Branch circuits and found this to be very interesting.. Thoughts??

Electriciansparadise -- Multiwire Branch Circuits
Good find there. Its been awhile since ive installed any MWBC. Where possible i always use sperate 12/2's.

Hammerash, if you werent planning on it make sure you use 2 pole 20 amp breakers for your MWBC circuts. Its code, and it prevents your neutral from burning up under full load.
 
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Old 04-08-10, 09:23 AM
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yes, I was planning on using a double pole breaker.

when I was working on some electric on original house, I had problem with my tv not working. now I had removed an old circuit the night before, but had not touched this circuit. I checked outlet and it was dead? I started doing some diagnostic work on it and found that the hot was intact, but the neutral was not. more investegating and I found that the dead outlet had another wire going elsewhere-but it was only receptacle on that circuit? I followed it and it went to a receptacle on the circuit that I just killed the night before. I guess they lost neutral on the tv circuit, and stole (shared) the neutral with the other circuit, making a MWBC. unfortunately, they must not have totally understood the concept because both of the circuits were on same phase! This was major hazard as the unbreakered neutral could have been overloaded. Luckily, no big loads were ever put on those circuits. The article you pointed to doesn't discuss another potential problem with MWBC-losing the neutral, which then subjects appliances on the circuits to 240V! I was a little hesitant to use them, but after reading a lot and discussing on these forums, I decided to use them.
 
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Old 04-08-10, 10:56 AM
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The article you pointed to doesn't discuss another potential problem with MWBC-losing the neutral, which then subjects appliances on the circuits to 240V
Not it would not be 240 it would still be 120. It is 120 per phase either way just that if the return is gone and the breaker does not trip it will keep feeding 120 continuously to each circuit and fry the hell out of them.

What the article is saying is that if they are ON THE SAME PHASE, it will have all of the return on the neutral at the same time (how every many amps each appliance is pulling at once) returning and overheating the wire which would burn up the neutral and could lead to disastrous issues if the breakers do not do their job. This is why i said i would put them on DEDICATED RUNS! Meaning a 12/2 for each. A hot, ground, and a neutral on each circuit, nothing shared.
 
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Old 04-08-10, 11:27 AM
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I understand the MWBC silver tattoo. as you can see from my story, they shared the neutral on two circuits on SAME phase. the heart of the problem is that the neutral is NOT breakered-the breaker only senses the current on the hot leg. so you could have near 20 amps on circuit A and 20 amps on circuit B so neither breaker would trip but the current on neutral would be near 40amps!

I didn't believe that you could get 240 volts if you lost the neutral at panel or somewhere between panel and the splittng of neutral. I read it in several books. so I diagrammed it out and sure enough you will get 240volts. try it with diagram. been while since I looked at it but I think you would need something plugged into each leg for it to happen. the current would go from panel down one leg and through appliance 1, but then be unable to return to the panel via neutral. so it would go via neutral to the other appliance and through the appliance and meet up with the hot coming from other breaker--so you have current flowing between two out of phase breakers from panel=240volts!
 
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Old 04-08-10, 11:58 AM
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your wrong on this one silver...if you had a 20 amp heater in outlet a and a 20 amp heater on outlet b on a 3 wire multi wire branch and the breakers were on the same phase 40 amps would flow through the neutral
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 04-08-10 at 02:54 PM.
  #30  
Old 04-08-10, 12:01 PM
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And if you lost neutral and had a 1500 watt heater in outlet a and a 60 watt lamp on outlet b and lost the neutral back to the panel the heater would act as a shunt and the bulb would get around 200 volts at and burn out pretty fast....
 
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Old 04-08-10, 12:08 PM
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Just because its a microwave and fridge doesn't mean someone wont plug in something else and lots of other ****...it happens every day...
 
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Old 04-08-10, 12:11 PM
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Just because its a microwave and fridge doesn't mean someone wont plug in something else and lots of other ****...it happens every day...
How is this even relevant? Are you gonna go plug your fridge up in your bathroom?
 
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Old 04-08-10, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by SilverTattoo View Post
How is this even relevant? Are you gonna go plug your fridge up in your bathroom?
pretty sure a bathroom wouldn't use a mwbc

but iv seen in a house i was working in the power was out in the upper floor except the bathroom and they had power strips and lamp-cords goin to every room from the bathroom. overcurrent protected yes...yet still overloaded and still a fire hazard
 
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Old 04-08-10, 12:26 PM
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Staying on Subject.

Ok, for the sake of argument, i think this thread has been nuked. Back to the OP. Is there a limit on the downstream of a GFI? in short. NO. asked and answered. If theres any other questions or concerns about MWBC's then lets start a new thread. Hammerash, sorry for how hijacked this thread became.
 
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Old 04-08-10, 12:34 PM
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I know Joe we got off topic but we were talking with hammer and I agree with him 100%. We all are suppost to be here to help people not insult them.
 
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Old 04-08-10, 01:10 PM
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Enough.....

You all have a terminology thing going on more than anything else.

It seems to me all of you have a few valid points, but there are also a few extremely unlikely situations being discussed.

Lets all (you all...lol) take a deep breath.

I'll let an Electrical Mod sort it all out.

Hammer...I PM'd you about something.
 
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Old 04-08-10, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Enough.....

You all have a terminology thing going on more than anything else.

It seems to me all of you have a few valid points, but there are also a few extremely unlikely situations being discussed.

Lets all (you all...lol) take a deep breath.

I'll let an Electrical Mod sort it all out.

Hammer...I PM'd you about something.
Gunguy I will dealt with them in a moment.

to the rest of the readers in here please keep it civil in here otherwise myself or other Moderators will lock this subject.

Silver ., I did check the " backdoor history" what we moderators can use. and you are on borderline with it so please keep it clean.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 04-09-10, 12:41 PM
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My fault marc. I will have to limit myself to 4 beer max before i submit a answer into the forum.
 
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Old 04-09-10, 12:56 PM
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ST....
I learned a long time ago (not just here), that there is a time for everything. At least a few years back, you could just hang up the phone before someone answered, or not mail that letter you wrote last nite.

Once an e-mail/text/post/etc is sent...you are pretty much on the hook for it.

I am mostly a day poster/chatter...once 5-6 PM comes...I have other priorities.
 
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Old 04-09-10, 01:03 PM
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Yea I totally agree and normally I would not even be on here but, due to this economy and having no work, this happens to be a new outlet for me at the moment. I do hear what your saying though. Tonight will be one of those nights.

Have a good one
 
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