Residential Duplex Receptacle Installation

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Old 04-16-10, 03:47 AM
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Question Residential Duplex Receptacle Installation

Hi all.
Installing receptacles in Garage and have a couple questions, one which probably seems silly to most of you:

1) Any suggestions as to brand/model/price? Lutron?
I have heard some use the "back stab" type. I do not mind curling wire and using the side screws myself- my time is "free" to me. Also I have seen where some use better plastic and do not chip very easily - as well as hold the plug better.

2) Which way is the proper way a receptacle is to be installed - with the round ground holes above the slots or below? I have looked at many installations at other homes/offices/etc and have seen them both ways.

As you probably can tell from the second question above, I have an exciting life.....

Thanks.
 
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Old 04-16-10, 05:00 AM
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I like the P&S Trademaster unbreakable nylon plates. I also like their switches and receptacles. The least expensive are good, but the CR series is built a little heavier and still reasonable in price. Lutron makes nice dimmers.

Ground up or down is a personal preference.

Since the receptacles will be in a garage they should be GFI protected.
 
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Old 04-16-10, 05:30 AM
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I found a box of outlets either from Lowe's or Home Depot that had backstab "type" holes in the back, but were actually secured by a screw. You only had to stip the wire just like a typical backtab application.The best of both worlds!! Dont use the traditional backstabs. Over the years, every one of them has failed in my home. You plug something in and the whole line goes out! You remome the outlet and all the wires pop out. It may be a brand issue, but im suprised its still allowed.
 
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Old 04-16-10, 06:00 AM
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I think Povertyacresmyk is refering to side wired receptacles. More expensive and often sold for commercial applications. The wire slides under a plate on the side and the plate is then tightened on the wire with a screw. Gives a good solid connection with plenty of contact area with out having to wrap the wire around the screw. Most GFCIs are made this way but this form of connection is available in non-GFCI receptacles also.
 
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Old 04-16-10, 07:27 AM
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there was no plate like the GFI outlets... it had 4 holes in the back much like a backstab, but when your tightened the ususal screws on the side, it secured the wire inserted in the back. If I recall , they were a little more ... but I really liked them for ease of installation.
 
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Old 04-16-10, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by povertyacresmyk View Post
there was no plate like the GFI outlets... it had 4 holes in the back much like a backstab, but when your tightened the ususal screws on the side, it secured the wire inserted in the back. If I recall , they were a little more ... but I really liked them for ease of installation.
There is a plate, but it's on the inside and you can't see it. When you tighten the screw, you're pulling the plate against the wire internally.

And yes, they're the way to go if you don't want to wrap wire around screws. Backstab style receptacles without a mechanical securing mechanism (screw and plate) do not meet my personal minimum standards. My opinion is they're a major part of why arc fault breakers were deemed necessary across the board in residental applications.
 
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Old 04-16-10, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by 66Cyclone View Post
brand/model/price? Lutron?
Any of the major brands are fine. I prefer the receptacles around the $2.00-2.50 price point. The cheaper bulk price ones are flimsy low quality and the more expensive ones are unnecessary for all but the most demanding applications.

Either side-wire (wrap wire around screw) or back-wire (tighten wire in pressure plate) make a very good connection when installed correctly. Back stabs (push wire in hole, no pressure plate) make a lousy connection that will eventually fail.

round ground holes above the slots or below?
It is up to you - the code does not specify an orientation. You could mount them sideways or diagonal if you wanted. The theory behind grounds-up is that it's safer if you drop something made of thin metal like a straight edge onto a half-plugged-in-cord it would contact the ground pin before the hot pin. It might have happened once or twice in the history of the world, but I find that situation a bit contrived. Your garage receptacles should be GFCI protected anyway which provides better personnel protection than any ground at all.
 
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Old 04-16-10, 01:40 PM
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OK
Thank you all for your advice!
 
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