Rewire receptacle to 220V for new stove?


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Old 05-08-10, 11:56 AM
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Question Rewire receptacle to 220V for new stove?

Hey Everyone!

I just bought a new smooth top electric stove to replace my gas one as a mother's day gift. However, I noticed that our house only has a gas connection and a standard 110V outlet. However, checking behind the receptacle shows 2 gray wires, 2 white wires, and a copper wire. The wires appear to be 10 Gauge. Can I just buy a 220V receptacle and wire it up with 1 black, white, and copper? Thank you kindly!
 
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Old 05-08-10, 12:34 PM
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No! No! and No! A 110-120 volt outlet is not going to be wired with 10 gauge unless someone previously had 220 and re wired to 110 when replacing an electric stove with gas - doubtful.
I believe that the wiring codes now require four conductors, one of which is bare copper.
You will probably need to rewire from the new 220 receptacle to the breaker box and then install the proper size 220 breaker in the box.

You need to size the wiring and breaker to the requirements of your new stove.

You may want to re enter your post in the electrical forum for more info.
 
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Old 05-08-10, 12:54 PM
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I'd suggest taking it back and getting a gas one. You won't have the cost of new wiring and in most parts of the country gas cooking is cheaper then electric cooking.
 
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Old 05-08-10, 06:29 PM
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I assume you mean an electric freestanding range. If you actually mean a drop-in stove top, please let us know the electrical requirements from the installation manual for further details.

To use the electric range you will need to install a 40A 240V circuit. This is usually accomplished using #8-3g NM-B cable, a 40A double-pole breaker, and a NEMA 14-50R receptacle behind the range. The range will also need a four-wire cord and plug installed.
 
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Old 05-08-10, 08:52 PM
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Question Thanks All!

Thanks everyone! The house is pretty new, built in 2007 and the wiring appears to be pretty thick. It is definitely not candle wire and the wires themselves appear to be about 1/8" to 1/16" thick. Based on what I am reading, can I not put in a new higher fuse in the breaker box and just put two of the gray, hot wires together with 1 neutral wire and ground for a 3 prong connection? The oven is a freestanding, electric range and not a drop in.
 
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Old 05-08-10, 09:01 PM
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Exclamation Power Specs

Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
I assume you mean an electric freestanding range. If you actually mean a drop-in stove top, please let us know the electrical requirements from the installation manual for further details.

To use the electric range you will need to install a 40A 240V circuit. This is usually accomplished using #8-3g NM-B cable, a 40A double-pole breaker, and a NEMA 14-50R receptacle behind the range. The range will also need a four-wire cord and plug installed.
Specified power-supply cord ratings for Samsung FE-R300 are:
Range Rating, watts: 120/240V 3 Wire - 8750 - 16500 or 120/208V 3 Wire - 7801 - 12500.... 40 or 50A.... 1 and 3/8" diameter power cord.
 
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Old 05-08-10, 09:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Palvaran View Post
Thanks everyone! The house is pretty new, built in 2007 and the wiring appears to be pretty thick. It is definitely not candle wire and the wires themselves appear to be about 1/8" to 1/16" thick. Based on what I am reading, can I not put in a new higher fuse in the breaker box and just put two of the gray, hot wires together with 1 neutral wire and ground for a 3 prong connection? The oven is a freestanding, electric range and not a drop in.
Based on this post I would suggest you call an electrician to install the new receptacle. I would also suggest you buy a basic book on home wiring such as "Wiring Simplified" available at Amazon and Home Depot. You really need a basic understanding before you do this kind of work.
 
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Old 05-09-10, 01:56 AM
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I am not suprised with some home they used the SER cable so if that the case it is legit to use it for the range circuit if that was 16mmX3 { 6AWG - 3 } cable in alum verison it have to be on 40 amp breaker but if that was in copper wire verison it can handle 50 amp without issue.

Note here:
If that was 16mm in THHN/THWN format it can go little higher { 60 amp max } but as it in the NM cable forget it due the code have tempture rating on them.

Ray.,

I am thinking that the OP did mention two gray conductors if that is true then the OP did have SER cable I know I ran into like that couple of them allready espcally with alum verison they go that route. { I know only one manufacter do this way the rest of other manufacters don't do that way they will add a red line one of the conductors }

OP.,
It will be wise to call in electrician to verify to see if the cable is correct for your useage or you can post the photo here we can able determed if that is legit for your useage.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 05-09-10, 03:17 PM
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Thanks all, here are the pictures.







 
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Old 05-09-10, 03:36 PM
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The 20 amp breaker turned off confirms that you cannot use that for a 40 or 50 amp stove. Those are #12 wires, only good for 20 amps.


You will need to have a new 40 or 50 amp 4 wire circuit installed.

PS, those gray wires are actually black.

PSS, the bare grounding conductor could have been installed around the screw better too. I would loosen the screw and secure more of the loop under the screw head.
 
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Old 05-09-10, 05:22 PM
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Question

I think I understand, the wiring is not rated to handle the load so it would be completely unsafe and the additional cost of hiring someone to do it probably isn't worth it.

That leaves only 2 options.
1) Can I use a Step Up Voltage Transformer? Isn't just a plug that goes over the standard 2 120V outlets? If not, then that only leaves,

2) Take back the stove and get the gas.

I would really like to keep the stove, but if it is not feasible to use the transformer, well that decides that!

Thanks all!
 
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Old 05-09-10, 06:29 PM
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The transformer is not an option.
 
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Old 05-09-10, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Palvaran View Post
I think I understand, the wiring is not rated to handle the load so it would be completely unsafe and the additional cost of hiring someone to do it probably isn't worth it.
That leaves only 2 options.
1) Can I use a Step Up Voltage Transformer?
Not an option A transformer doesn't change the total power available. You have 2400watts available. You need 9600 watts at 40 amp max available in a 40 amp circuit.
If not, then that only leaves
2) Take back the stove and get the gas.
I would really like to keep the stove, but if it is not feasible to use the transformer, well that decides that!
Why? You could still run a new circuit yourself after reading a book like Wiring Simplified. Personally I prefer gas but that is just my opinion. If you like electric then go for it. Once you understand what you are doing from studying the book we can help with the details.
 
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Old 05-09-10, 07:36 PM
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Thanks All

Reading other articles on 220V wiring and although it seems simple, the hard part appears to be keeping from completely destroying the drywall in the house. Is there a simple method to get the 220V wiring from the breaker to a 1st floor kitchen in a 2 story house?
 
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Old 05-09-10, 07:45 PM
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Is the stove on an inside or outside wall? Is there a basement? Are there kitchen cabinets next to the stove?
 
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Old 05-09-10, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Is the stove on an inside or outside wall? Is there a basement? Are there kitchen cabinets next to the stove?
Yeppers, there are kitchen cabinets on either side of the oven. Unfortunately, there is no basement. The freestanding range has an outside wall behind it.
 
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Old 05-09-10, 09:41 PM
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You can run run conduit from the panel along the outside wall and enter behind the stove. If you don't like the look of conduit on the outside wall you can bury it most of the way. If your breaker box is outside it will probably be easy. If it is inside it is still doable with minimal disruption of Sheetrock
 
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Old 05-10-10, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Palvaran View Post
Unfortunately, there is no basement.
Is it a crawlspace or slab?
 
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Old 05-10-10, 08:39 AM
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According to his profile Texas so I'd almost bet slab given it doesn't seem to be an old house.
 
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Old 05-10-10, 06:19 PM
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Thanks All

It's a slab. The problem is that the outside wall the oven is connected to is on the opposite side of the house as the breaker box.
 
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Old 05-10-10, 07:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Palvaran View Post
It's a slab. The problem is that the outside wall the oven is connected to is on the opposite side of the house as the breaker box.
Did you mean stove top? I don't see them being on opposite sides as a problem. If you wanted you could also go up to the attic, through the attic, and back down but going around the house seems simpler to me especially since it is a two story house.
 
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Old 05-11-10, 09:05 AM
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It is almost certainly not worth it to re-wire, I'd take the stove back and get a new gas one. Honest question, why on earth would you trade in a gas stove for an electric? Have you ever had an electric stove? They suck. I have one now (glass "smooth top") and I can't wait to get rid of it and get a gas stove, but I have to have a gas line run first.

Take the stove back and get a new gas stove. You'll also end up paying less to run it most likely unless you have really low electric rates.
 
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Old 05-11-10, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Auream View Post
It is almost certainly not worth it to re-wire, I'd take the stove back and get a new gas one. Honest question, why on earth would you trade in a gas stove for an electric? Have you ever had an electric stove? They suck. I have one now (glass "smooth top") and I can't wait to get rid of it and get a gas stove, but I have to have a gas line run first.

Take the stove back and get a new gas stove. You'll also end up paying less to run it most likely unless you have really low electric rates.
That was the essence of my original reply to the OP but the poster seemed so determined to have electric I went ahead and offered suggestions on how to do it. I agree though gas is the reasonable solution.
 
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Old 05-11-10, 06:41 PM
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Thanks Again All

I really do appreciate all of the quick responses and the knowledge everyone has conveyed. It has helped immensely. We bought the stove as mother's day gift since it was simple to clean and had a steam clean feature. Plus, the price was good and it would replace our "free" oven which came with the house which is a Hotpoint cheap one. In the end, I am going to default to everyone's wisdom and get a gas one if Sears will take this one back. We opened up and realized that there was no plug and that the plug wouldn't fit when we did get one, so I hope we can get a refund...
 
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Old 05-11-10, 07:32 PM
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We bought the stove as mother's day gift since it was simple to clean and had a steam clean feature.
Normally a particular model is available in both electric and gas. You may be able to get the same model with the same features but in gas. Don't treat it as a return but as a swap for the correct type when you speak to Sears.
 
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Old 05-12-10, 06:41 AM
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As ray2047 said, you can most likely find a nearly equivalent model range in gas instead of electric. Expect it to be about $50-$100 more than the electric model, but that's still cheaper than having a new 240v line run.

I used to work at Sears back in college, I'm sure you should have no problem swapping out the range unless they've changed their very liberal exchange/return policy significantly since I've worked there.
 
 

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