Receptacles: Push-on or Screw-on?


  #1  
Old 12-01-00, 11:28 AM
Guest
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Lightbulb

This may seem like a no-brainer, but isn't it more secure to screw the wire end on to the receptacle than to just push it into the slot provided on the back? I don't even know who invented the push-on but my perception of them is that they aren't very secure, and there is little contact area compared to when the wire is wrapped around a screw and tightened. Why even have the slot?

-Chris
 
  #2  
Old 12-01-00, 01:36 PM
Lew Falconer
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Talking push connections

You're absolutely right. Those slots shouldn't even be there to tempt people to use them. Always use the screws for a good secure connection
 
  #3  
Old 12-01-00, 02:53 PM
J
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There's a compromise on the market that I like. They are outlets you still just stick the wire into a hole in the back. But rather than rely on a springy clip to grab the wire, you then crank down a screw to compress the wire between two pieces of metal. These connections are easy to make, and you don't need to fuss with wrapping the wire around the screw. Furthermore, they seem to me to make an excellent connection.
 
  #4  
Old 12-01-00, 05:20 PM
Wgoodrich
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I too like the holes in the back that you can crank the screw down on the cunductor. I feel these to be one of the best connection for a device. Unfortunately money steps in. The devices that have the connection with the holes that the screw clamps down on tend to be the expensive style or 20 amp rated or more.

The electrical trade still feels that the springy is still adequate as a MINIMUM safety standard concerning connections of 15 amp rated circuits. The UL did require the holes to be reduced in diameter to prevent 12 ga twenty amp wire to be installed on the receptacles now.

I have yet to see a track record long enough to make a judgement on the 15 amp rated and limited connection of the holes with the springys. The holes were required to be reduced only a few years ago.

IF YOU HAVE A NEWER HOUSE BUILT IN THE 70S OR EARLY 80S THEN I STRONGLY ADVISE YOU TO TAKE THE RECEPTACLES OUT AND IF THEY ARE WITH 12 GA WIRING AND/OR 20 AMP RATED THEN SWITCH THE CONNECTIONS FROM THE SPINGY HOLES TO THE SCREWS FOR YOUR CONNECTION. INSPECT YOUR RECEPTACLES AND THE WIRES CONNECTED TO IT, FOR DAMAGE DUE TO HEAT. IF DAMAGE IS PRESENT THEN REPLACE THAT RECEPTACLE.

MANY DWELLINGS ARE SHOWING UP WITH FIRES OR LOSS OF POWER DUE TO BAD CONNECTIONS IN THIS TYPE OF SPRINGY HOLE CONNECTION OF THEIR RECEPTACLES.

Good Luck

Wg
 
  #5  
Old 12-07-00, 04:59 AM
J
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Here's a limited track record for you, wg. In a former life I ran a maintenance crew in a total electric apartment complex of 250 units which was built in the mid 70's. The E.C. used only the stab connectors. I showed up in the early 80's. And every single week of every year a resident would lose either one or a string of ten receptacles as a result of those darn pesky connectors. They're so fast to connect that it's a HUGE temptation if you're getting paid to install them. That's why I issued a mandate among the technicians on my crew to NEVER use them under penalty of reprimand, or worse for repeat offenders. My rationale to them was that it just might be one of them that gets beeped on a no-power service call in the middle of the night, and further that if it was me that got beeped and I found a new recep wired with stabbers I'd pull the service tickets on that unit and find out who the installer was, and instead of being entrusted to perform electrical repairs they'd be cleaning toilets from that day forward.

That's how strongly I feel about the stab-connectors. So if you're a homeowner and you use these you're probably going to have that recep drop out at some point in the future, and it's usually at the worst possible time, as Murphy's law dictates. Hope that shines a little more light on the subject.

JH
 
  #6  
Old 12-07-00, 05:44 AM
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Thanks Juice!!

I didn't think this thread would get even a sideways glance, but it's gotten a lot of attention. Your response was the most anecdotal and knee slappin' funny yet! It's so true though, whoever thought up those slip-on connectors wasn't thinking long term, rather, only in terms of time and $$.

Happy holidays,

Chris
 
  #7  
Old 12-08-00, 04:57 AM
J
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Thanks Chris. Glad enough to help out, just as happy to have entertained in the process. Happy Holidays to you.

Juice
 
 

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