Can you put a GFCI outlet on an AFCI protected circuit?


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Old 07-26-10, 08:29 PM
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Can you put a GFCI outlet on an AFCI protected circuit?

I have a circuit that needs both GFCI protection now and will need AFCI protection once I extend the circuit later. It's a new circuit in an unfinished basement (which means it needs GFCI now) to use as part of a temporary kitchen during a kitchen renovation. The circuit will eventually power the area around the breakfast nook in the finished kitchen which means it must be AFCI protected. So I'm not buying a regular breaker now and an AFCI breaker later, can I use the AFCI breaker now in combination with a GFCI outlet? Or can the GFCI circuitry somehow interfere with or damage the AFCI breaker?

I know they make combination AFCI / GFCI breakers (I would need a Cutler Hammer BR120CAFGF)... but I can't seem to find these locally.
 

Last edited by jbmdharris; 07-26-10 at 09:05 PM.
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Old 07-26-10, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by jbmdharris View Post
can I use the AFCI breaker now in combination with a GFCI outlet?
Yes, GFCI receptacles are compatible with AFCI breakers.

I know they make combination AFCI / GFCI breakers (I would need a Cutler Hammer BR120CAFGF)... but I can't seem to find these locally.
It would almost certainly need to be ordered through a supply house which is an Eaton (Cutler Hammer) dealer.
 
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Old 07-26-10, 09:49 PM
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Yes the GFCI will work with AFCI breakers.

The combo breaker you describe they will useally found in electrical supplier which they carry Eaton products they should have that on stock otherwise they can order you one and get it pretty quick.

Merci.
Marc
 
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Old 07-27-10, 01:31 AM
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Kitchen GFI protected circuits are not required to be AFCI protected.
 
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Old 07-27-10, 04:38 AM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
Kitchen GFI protected circuits are not required to be AFCI protected.
Correct. But this circuit is going to serve two purposes over time. At first, it is a circuit for a temporary kitchen in a basement which means GFCI but not AFCI is required... but after the renovation is complete, it will change to be a general circuit in a breakfast nook that is part of the new kitchen area which means AFCI but not GFCI will be required. (My area requires 2008 code) I'm just planning to go ahead and install the AFCI breaker when wiring up the temporary kitchen... thus it will be both GFCI and AFCI protected during the renovation. After the rough-in inspection, I'll tie in the breakfast nook into the circuit by either removing the GFCI and making the former GFCI a simple splice... or I'll keep it a GFCI receptacle in the basement (which really isn't required since I'll have a separate 20A GFCI protected circuit 2 feet to the left of this one.
 
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Old 07-28-10, 08:35 AM
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In my opinion, the breakfast nook should be served by one of the 20A small-appliance branch circuits, which like the kitchen countertops, must serve only receptacles and have GFCI protection. AFCI is not required on the small-appliance circuits.
 
 

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