GFCIs in the kitchen

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  #1  
Old 09-20-10, 09:09 PM
S
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GFCIs in the kitchen

So I am reading conflicting requirements.

I have several circuits in my kitchen on GFCI breakers (1 breaker per circuit!). The ones on GFCI, for various reasons (most are countertop receptacles near the sink) will stay on GFCI. No problem there.

I am unsure about three circuits:

1. The refrigerator outlet (dedicated circuit). GFCI not good because nuisance tripping possible, might lose all the food in the fridge over a long weekend. But is within 6 feet of the sink, so ...? What is NEC on this?

2. Similarly, a circuit that runs the garbage disposal and the dishwasher. Obviously, these are near the sink. Dishwasher is a hardwired receptacle but disposal is an outlet under the sink. GFCI required, or no because not countertop receptacles?

3. A circuit that has 2 outlets: the stove outlet and an end-of-run counter top outlet that is about 12 feet from the sink, on the other side of the stove.

Code and safety experts, opine please!
 
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Old 09-21-10, 01:45 AM
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Short answer, the only one that requires GFCI is the one shared by the stove. ALL countertop outlets need GFCI. The stove outlet need not be protected and the offender may be wired with a GFCI device rather than a GFCI breaker.

There is no requirement for GFCI protection on a garbage disposal or dishwasher, but it is not a bad idea to do it anyway. 99.999% of the time, when you go to hit that switch, your hands are going to be wet and it is a potential shock hazard.

There is also no 6' requirement in the kitchen. The 6' rule applies only to laundry and wet bar sinks. In the kitchen, the requirement is that ALL countertop outlets have GFCI protection, regardless of the distance to the sink. Even if there was a requirement, a stove or refrigerator receptacle would not be considered 'readily accessible', therefore would be exempt.

210.8(A)(6)
 
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Old 09-21-10, 08:27 AM
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Thanks Matt, very clear.

Ironically I may solve this by protecting the stove outlet(unnecessary) with a GFCI outlet, then I can have the remaining countertop outlet be downstream of it. That way the countertop outlets all appear the same (non-GFCI). Everything else is protected by GFCI breakers, so at present no GFCI outlets in there.
 
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Old 09-21-10, 09:09 AM
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I would use a GFCI breaker instead of hiding a GFCI receptacle behind the stove. No one is going to think to look there in the event of a trip.
 
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Old 09-21-10, 03:15 PM
S
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Experience wins over newbie thriftiness, good point. Especially since it is the stove outlet - why would a stove have a GFCI?

Probably spend the $$ after all and go with GFCI breaker ...
 
 

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