Reducing a 20 Amp circuit to a 15 amp


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Old 10-13-10, 08:38 PM
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Reducing a 20 Amp circuit to a 15 amp

I am currently running a 20 circuit to feed the washer/dryer(gas) and water purifier, all are GFCI.

Off of this I want to run lights in the bathroom which only really needs 15 amps.
I have a plug fuse w/switch (from a furnace hookup) that I would like to use to reduce and feed the circuit to 15 amp, then can use #14 wire instead of the #12that I am feeding the washer/dryer. Why I want to do this is that some of the wires will be and only need to be 14/3 to feed a light and fan which I have 200ft of.

Can I do this? The 15 amp fuse will be a screw-in plug but will be GFCI and only for lights.

Thanks
 
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Old 10-13-10, 08:46 PM
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Current code requires a dedicated 20a feed for bathroom receptacles.
15 amp fuse will be a screw-in plug but will be GFCI
No such thing as a GFCI fuse. Lights can be on a 15 amp circuit if separate from receptacle.
I have a plug fuse w/switch
Fuses don't have switches.

I apologize in advance but your post is so confused I suggest you don't have the basics to do any electrical. I suggest you call an electrician.
 
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Old 10-13-10, 09:50 PM
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Current code requires a dedicated 20a feed for bathroom receptacles.
Receptacles are currently GFCI 20 amp, only the lights will be reduced to 15 amp.

No such thing as a GFCI fuse
The entire circuit IS protected by GFCI, I realize there is no Fuse/plug GFCI!

I apologize in advance but your post is so confused I suggest you don't have the basics to do any electrical. I suggest you call an electrician.

With all due respect, no electrician will be required! I do know the basics of electrical. I'm only trying to ask if what I'm doing would be correct to reduce the amperage rating from 20 to 15 using a fused product that is sold to protect from overload.

Again, all the 20Amp circuit is now GFCI protected,
Just asking.
 
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Old 10-13-10, 10:36 PM
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Ray, I suspect this is what 67 is referring to when he mentions a fuse / switch combination unit. It has a screw base under the cover for a standard base fuse and a separate switch. They come in several varieties and are used as a cover on a J&P box.

(Courtesy of Google images.)


The biggest problem is that the receptacle for laundry equipment is required to be a dedicated circuit so it cannot be used for lighting in a different room.
 
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Old 10-14-10, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by 67lplc View Post
Current code requires a dedicated 20a feed for bathroom receptacles.
Receptacles are currently GFCI 20 amp, only the lights will be reduced to 15 amp.
The washer is a dedicated 20A receptacle. Doing what you propose creates a violation of 550.12(c)

(C) Laundry Area. Where a laundry area is provided, a
20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to supply the
laundry receptacle outlet(s). This circuit shall have no other
outlets.

You could come off of the bathroom 20A circuit so long as it only serves that one bathroom and so long as the fan and lights serve that bathroom..... or come off a general lighting circuit....... or run a new homerun to the panel.
 
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Old 10-14-10, 07:24 AM
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Dannys code citation would be correct if this is a mobile home. If this is not a mobile home the article would be 210.11(C)(2). It has the same restrictions.
 
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Old 10-14-10, 08:10 AM
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oops, it was early.
 
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Old 10-14-10, 10:29 AM
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Thanks Furd for clarifiying the device, and all other replies.

Ray, I do know electrical, granted not all the codes but don't appreciate your kneejerk reaction and put downs. You also did this about a year ago in one of my post. I recently installed a 60 amp subpanel in my parents detached garage and it passed all inspections and codes.

Thanks for everyone help.
I will run the lights off another 15 amp circuit.
 
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Old 10-14-10, 11:39 AM
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Ray, I do know electrical, granted not all the codes but don't appreciate your kneejerk reaction and put downs. You also did this about a year ago in one of my post.
Perhaps then it is the way you write your posts. Maybe strive for more clarity. I still don't fully understand what you were asking. No offense was meant.
 
 

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