Installing GFCI outlets in old home

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  #1  
Old 10-19-10, 11:06 PM
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Installing GFCI outlets in old home

I live in a home built in 1931. Most of the wiring is original knob and tube, except for the kitchen and bathroom which were upgraded in the 80's and have more modern plastic-clad wiring.

The kitchen and bathroom outlets are all 3 prong, but only one or two outlets are grounded, the others aren't (the ground wire is either missing entirely or it's there but seems to not be connected). The bedrooms outlets are all 2 prong.

I would like to replace all the outlets in the kitchen and bathroom with GFCI outlets, even if the missing ground makes them somewhat less useful.

I also seem to recall reading somewhere that having GFCI in the bedrooms is a good idea, to help with sparking or something.

Any thoughts on this? Is this in keeping with current electrical codes, even if the ground seems to be missing or non-functional throughout most of the kitchen/bathroom?

Thanks,

Razvan.
 
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Old 10-19-10, 11:38 PM
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I would like to replace all the outlets in the kitchen and bathroom with GFCI outlets, even if the missing ground makes them somewhat less useful.
While they wouldn't be grounded which is needed for things like surge protectors that would increase personal safety.
I also seem to recall reading somewhere that having GFCI in the bedrooms is a good idea, to help with sparking or something.
That would be AFCI breakers that detect sparks. There are no AFCI receptacles. AFCI breakers also provide some GFCI protection but usually not as much as a GFCI. What is the make and model of yor panel? There may be combo AFCI/GFCI breakers available for it.
 
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Old 10-20-10, 09:02 AM
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Adding GFCI protection to ungrounded (two prong) circuits is a legal remedy to increase the safety of those old circuits.
 
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Old 10-30-10, 05:41 PM
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If he adds GFCI to the ungrounded circuits how does this provide added protection? Is there then just 2 wires connected to the GFCI outlet?

thanks
 
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Old 10-30-10, 06:33 PM
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The GFI will properly operate without a ground. It will still sense the imbalance in current and trip.
 
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Old 10-31-10, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
There are no AFCI receptacles.
This will soon change, and if you have a copy of the 2011 NEC, you will see what I am talking about. Looks like those manufacturers have been lobbying the regulatory members....

406.4(D)(4) Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection. Where a receptacle outlet is supplied by a branch circuit that requires arc-fault circuit interrupter protection as specified
elsewhere in this Code, a replacement receptacle at this outlet shall be one of the following:
(1) A listed outlet branch circuit type arc-fault circuit interrupter receptacle
(2) A receptacle protected by a listed outlet branch circuit type arc-fault circuit interrupter type receptacle
(3) A receptacle protected by a listed combination type arc-fault circuit interrupter type circuit breaker
This requirement becomes effective January 1, 2014.
 
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Old 11-01-10, 08:49 AM
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I believe there's also a provision in the 2008 code for AFCI receptacles, but to my knowledge none exist yet.
 
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