Running Low & High Voltage Cables

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  #1  
Old 11-15-10, 08:31 PM
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Running Low & High Voltage Cables

Would it be ok to run, high-voltage and low (coax & cat5) voltage cables side-by-side? I they are run side-by-side, is there any material that can be used to shield one from the other?

Thank You,
Fernando
 
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  #2  
Old 11-15-10, 08:45 PM
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If any reason you have to run side by side keep them minum of 12 inches apart to keep the electrical interfernice on low voltage / data cable.

But not in the conduit at all this part you can NOT intermix both line and low voltage cable at all.

That will required a seperated conduit if you go this route.

Merci.
Marc
 
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Old 11-15-10, 09:07 PM
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I have a run that's 25' where they need to be run next to one another, and do not have 12". Since they have to run close, is there any type of shielding I could use?

Thank You
 
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Old 11-15-10, 09:40 PM
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Hang on tight someone who know the set up better on coax / data cable
Than I do but I know there is a sheilded verison but one of the members in here will know more details so they will chime in soon.

Merci.
Marc
 
  #5  
Old 11-16-10, 05:27 AM
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The risk of interference over that distance is pretty good, especially if the AC power is handling anything with a motor in it. If you're running in the void between studs, putting the low-voltage cables on one stud and the AC power cables on the other is plenty of separation. Another option is to run both LV cables in metal conduit (flex or pipe) and ground the conduit. For the coax, use RG6 /u Quad shield, which has better shielding properties. Shielded UTP Cat 5e will also help. Attach the shield to ground at one end only.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 09:45 AM
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Also make sure to use the proper terminators for the cable you decide to install and install them correctly onto the cable. Poorly installed coax connectors in particular can leak interference into the cable. Coax and Cat 5/5e/6 are all pretty resistant to interference, but other types of low voltage systems, especially if it is not a balanced signal, will really pick up the hum from the power lines. If this is a phone line, do not use flat cable, use a UTP cable like cat 3 or better.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 11:42 AM
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If for some reason you absolutely can't get the 12" of separation on a run parallel to AC (using the opposite sides of the stud cavity will usually give you 15"), then there are a couple things that will help.. First of all, use RG6/QS (quad shield) coax, or if you can find it locally RG11 (but be aware, RG11 is twice as thick as RG6, 3 times as expensive, requires special connectors, and it is a beast to work with). You could also enclose that run in EMT (metal conduit), or install a metal stud in between the LV and HV.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 02:47 PM
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Let me first start by thanking all of you.

I will, most likely, install the low voltage cables in metal conduit, for the parallel runs. What would the recommendation be if the high voltage crosses the low voltage cables, in perpendicular?
 
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Old 11-16-10, 03:37 PM
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Yes, cross the cables at 90 degrees to each other.
 
  #10  
Old 11-16-10, 07:14 PM
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So it's ok to cross low and high voltage cables, but not run them in parallel?

Thank You
 
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Old 11-16-10, 11:02 PM
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Oui.,

You got that right.

Merci.
Marc
 
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Old 11-17-10, 01:07 PM
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Would it be ok to run the low voltage cabled inside black pipe? My neighbor is going to throw some 1" black pipe away, and was was thinkg if it would be ok to run them inside of their, that I could use that instead of buying conduit.
 
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Old 11-17-10, 01:11 PM
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Just don't snag the cables and it should be okay. Black iron pipe has a welded seam with sharp ridges inside the pipe. LV is largely unregulated by any codes so you can pretty much do as you please with it.
 
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