"Push In" wire connectors

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Old 11-21-10, 08:46 AM
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"Push In" wire connectors

I installed a ceiling fan/light during a bath reno. The space available for making the connections to the supply wiring is very limited so I opted for the Ideal push in connectors instead of wire nuts.

I remember quite a bit of discussion about push in connectors a year or so ago. IIRC most of the electricians had reservations and some didn't trust them at all.

The only other time I have used them they came with some recessed cans I installed. This is the first time I have used them since. I may never use another wire nut. They are easy and foolproof to install (just follow directions), and have a really strong grip.

Cost aside, are there any drawbacks to using these wire connectors?
 
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Old 11-21-10, 09:29 AM
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Wayne...it seems when I installed some ceiling fans a while back that they used those type connectors. No issues in 3 yrs...and thats in a situation subject to some small amount of vibration. Can't believe they are that bad if manufacturers use them.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 09:55 AM
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wegos

my rule of thumb with "wegos"

if it came with the fixture, I use them ( unless i have 4 wires to group then it's going to be a wire nut ), but it if did not, I use wire nuts. I never use them in make up boxes or any receptacles ( for pigtailing , and in general never use them anywhere. I have seen them fail in boxes that were made up, in receptacles ( pigtailed out ), because the connection is not as tight as wirenut ( especially since you pre twist wires before applying the wirenut ) and the connection got too hot ( for what ever reason ) and arced through the connector.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 01:01 PM
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Ideal now sells a connector that allows you to extend wires that are too short in a box. I remember countless times when sheetrockers cut or nicked my wires with there rotozips. These are small push in connectors similar to the ones the OP is talking about, except that one wire goes in on one side and the other goes in on the other, basically allowing you to "extend" the wire without having to use a wire nut. Seems pretty neat to me.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 03:26 PM
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I have used them and never had any problems...yet.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 04:17 PM
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Never had a failure in a light fixture or anywhere else. Sure are time (translated "Knuckle") savers.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by mikerios View Post
my rule of thumb with "wegos"

if it came with the fixture, I use them ( unless i have 4 wires to group then it's going to be a wire nut ), but it if did not, I use wire nuts. I never use them in make up boxes or any receptacles ( for pigtailing , and in general never use them anywhere. I have seen them fail in boxes that were made up, in receptacles ( pigtailed out ), because the connection is not as tight as wirenut ( especially since you pre twist wires before applying the wirenut ) and the connection got too hot ( for what ever reason ) and arced through the connector.
This is a matter of preference and is not required to install a wire nut.

I have had not callbacks from the use of the push-in connectors.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 05:08 PM
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The wagos are fine for light to med loaded circuit due majorty of the wagos I know they are listed in USA side are 20 amp max but check the package for more infomation due there is some variations on that.

I have used the European verison of Wago connectors and they work pretty good on 16 amp circuit is not a issue but once you get into 20 or 24 amp circuits it kinda toss up depending on what the load is.

Merci.
Marc
 
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Old 11-22-10, 01:02 PM
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In my very limited electrical experience I've seen two fail-sort of.

The first was probably user error. I pulled out a switch to look in the box and a wire pulled free from the push-in. I assume if it had been inserted correctly that would not have happened but I may be wrong.

With the second, the whole corner of the switch cracked diagonally across the push-in hole. It may have been like that since installation, I don't know, but it only started showing symptoms after 7 or 8 years.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 01:08 PM
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smalc...I think you mean stab connection on switches? Everyone will agree that those are the worst things ever. Not the backwire type that are clamped by screws, but the type that are just pushed in and held by spring tension are very prone to failure. No electrician worth his salt uses them.

The connectors being discussed are different.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 03:04 PM
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No electrician worth his salt uses them.
Not quite. There is at least one professional electrician (who is also an electrical instructor and I think member of a NEC panel) who states the back stab terminals are just fine.

Another forum
 
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Old 11-22-10, 03:56 PM
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Lol...nice read...I'll go through the whole thing later. I believe I'll stick with the opinions and experiences of the people who post here, over that of the one "instructor/Pro" over there. Real life and theory do not always agree.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 04:49 PM
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I'll agree with Vic. I have countless calls to homes where lights don't illuminate in closets, or flicker at the dining room table, or just don't work. I believe I can conservatively say that 100% of the calls just required the removal of the wire in the stab back (or it fell out when the switch came out). I have a probe made from an old mini screw driver that will fit most all of them. Easy fix, nice money.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 06:28 PM
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Remember when the backstabs were rated for #12 then the hole size was reduced to #14 only. Wonder what the story was behind that?
 
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Old 11-22-10, 07:20 PM
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So, I think from the other thread from Furd's reference we have established the back stab on a 15 amp residential device meets the minimum requirement approved by U.L. That's not a lot different than the NEC being the minimum requirement. I prefer to go one better than minimum in many situations, not all situations, but many.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Remember when the backstabs were rated for #12 then the hole size was reduced to #14 only. Wonder what the story was behind that?
The issue was the 20 amp circuits were pushing the limit with the concats in backstabbing and I have few failures from that and with 4.0mm˛ { #12 AWG } I just use the screw or backwired devices.

Merci.
Marc
 
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