GFCI Breaker for Boat Lift - Options?

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Old 12-07-10, 04:31 PM
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GFCI Breaker for Boat Lift - Options?

I'm wiring my pier and have a question about the GFCIs for the boat lift motors. The two motors are 3/4hp 230V. 230v two pole GFCIs are expensive in the $280 range. Can I use two single pole GFCIs, one on the red and one on the black with the same affect as buying a two pole 230v GFCI?

I plan to run four #8 stranded copper singles, through conduit 190 feet to a disconnect at the head of the pier and then another 190 feet in conduit to a breaker panel at the lift. The lift motors were wired for 115 with GFCI's on the power cords. I can't re-use the GFCI's that came with the lift.
Should I put the GFCI at the source panel, say a 30 amp GFCI to feed the whole pier?
Should I use one at the pier breaker panel and run both motors off a single 20 amp GFCI breaker?
Should I use two 15 amp GFCI's at the pier breaker panel, one for each motor?

Thanks
 
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Old 12-07-10, 06:45 PM
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That price is way out of line for a 2 pole GFI.

Are you setting a subpanel for the pier? What other loads will be feed from the pier?
 
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Old 12-07-10, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by detanner View Post
I'm wiring my pier and have a question about the GFCIs for the boat lift motors. The two motors are 3/4hp 230V. 230v two pole GFCIs are expensive in the $280 range. Can I use two single pole GFCIs, one on the red and one on the black with the same affect as buying a two pole 230v GFCI?
No. They need to have a common handle trip. Also they will not work properly due to the wiring of a single pole GFCI and a two pole GFCI breaker.

Originally Posted by detanner View Post
I plan to run four #8 stranded copper singles, through conduit 190 feet to a disconnect at the head of the pier and then another 190 feet in conduit to a breaker panel at the lift. The lift motors were wired for 115 with GFCI's on the power cords. I can't re-use the GFCI's that came with the lift.
Should I put the GFCI at the source panel, say a 30 amp GFCI to feed the whole pier?
Should I use one at the pier breaker panel and run both motors off a single 20 amp GFCI breaker?
Should I use two 15 amp GFCI's at the pier breaker panel, one for each motor?
What kind of total load are we talking about here? With the distances your talking about here you might have some issues with voltage drop.
What code cycle are you one where you live? GFCI rules vary. Also is this a residential location?
 
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Old 12-07-10, 09:57 PM
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What brand name breaker you have there now due I know most common two pole GFCI breakers are useally about 60 to 120 Euros depending on the brandname.

*8 stranded conductor may not fit in some of the two pole 30 amp breakers may end up make a pigtail to reduce to *10 copper conductor.

but the distance you got there I really seriously suggest that you have subpanel at the pier or dock area due the nature of GFCI breaker it will be much better just use standard two pole breaker at your main load centre.

Now which way are you plan to do with your lift motours keep them at 120 volt or reconferated to 240 volts ?? { per NEC code you will need GFCI regaurdless of voltage you use }

almost 400 feet of run that will really affect the way you use on the motor connection if you wired up on 240 volts it may not be a issue but if you leave them on 120 volts then yes you will have issue with them with propsal conductor size { *8 AWG copper }

Merci.
Marc
 
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Old 12-08-10, 03:58 AM
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GFCI Breakers and Loads for Boat Lift Wiring

The motors will be wired for 230 and I plan to put them on seperate 15 amp breakers at the lift. I have a GE panel at the lift. At the source, I have a 100 amp Square D Homeline panel. I think I'll put a 220 two pole GFCI in that panel to feed the whole pier. The motor book calls for #10 copper at 300 feet for 230, so I decided to go with #8. Worse case is that I use one motor at a time...no big deal. As for other loads, I'll have a circuit for the battery charger for the boat and some lights, but all of these will be off when the lift is in operation, so it's only one load at a time. The breakers say they will take up to #8 wire. Location is North Carolina.

Thanks for the feedback.
 
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Old 12-08-10, 04:26 AM
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Although the other posts didn't suggest it, you will need the entire pier protected off site via GFCI breaker, as no unprotected line voltage would be allowed on it. BUT since you already plan on that, you're OK. This is a TVA lake, right?
 
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Old 12-08-10, 09:31 AM
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GFIC Limits

I was just looking at the GE GFIC web page and for a 50 amp GFIC breaker it states not to have more than 250 ft of wire or you'll get false trips. So I'll replace the disconnect that I planned to have at the head or beginning of the pier with a outdoor load center and put the GFIC breaker in that. It can double as the disconnect, if needed and it will protect the whole pier and if it trips it won't be so far to walk to reset. The GFIC sells for $86.00. Thoughts?
 
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Old 12-08-10, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by detanner View Post
I was just looking at the GE GFIC web page and for a 50 amp GFIC breaker it states not to have more than 250 ft of wire or you'll get false trips.
That is correct. The longer the wire the greater the chance of a false trip.

So I'll replace the disconnect that I planned to have at the head or beginning of the pier with a outdoor load center and put the GFIC breaker in that. It can double as the disconnect, if needed and it will protect the whole pier and if it trips it won't be so far to walk to reset. The GFIC sells for $86.00. Thoughts?
Sounds like a good plan.
 
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