Wiring/circuit breaker question

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  #1  
Old 12-17-10, 12:08 PM
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Wiring/circuit breaker question

Among some kitchen updating items planned for next month will be replacing an old electrical cooktop with a gas cooktop. The old electrical cooktop is fed by a 6 or 8 gauge wire and a 50 amp circuit. The gas cooktop will only require a 15 amp hook up. Would it be within code to simply replace the 50 amp breaker with a 15 amp and use the same heavy gauge wire for the gas cooktop? Thanks.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 12:18 PM
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I doubt that a 6 or 8 guage wire will fit a 15 or 20 amp breaker, and it definitely wouldn't fit the new 15- or 20-amp receptacle you will need.

What is the electrical power rating (in Watts) of the new gas stove?
 
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Old 12-17-10, 12:32 PM
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1800 watts. As far as the receptable goes I would route the cable to a junction box and connect it to a 12/2. Just exploring an alternate method to snaking a 100+ feet of new wiring through my limited access attic.
 

Last edited by phoebers; 12-17-10 at 12:52 PM.
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Old 12-17-10, 12:46 PM
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I'm not a pro, and you should definitely wait for them to post, but I would use a 20 amp receptacle and breaker for this, and 12/2 NM Romex. It shouldn't be too difficult to run the new cable the same route as the old 6 or 8 guage. Remove the old, run the new, install the breaker. There's more, but well go from there later.

I'm curious as to what the plug on your new gas stove looks like. Check this link and see if you can compare. This IS needed to find the correct receptacle.

Also curious (from the pros) would a 15 amp hookup work here, or would you be concerned with startup current?
 
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Old 12-17-10, 12:49 PM
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There is no startup on a gas range or cooktop. All it needs is enough voltage for the ignitor. Typically this is a few milli-volts.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 12:51 PM
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If the old wiring is 4 wire yes. If it is three conductor NM cable no. If it's metal conduit probably. If it's is metallic cable maybe. SE is iffy at best.
Tell us all the wires you have and colors.

Actually the size of the wires isn't a problem. Smaller gauge wire can be connected to the larger gauge wire.

Easiest though is to just use a counter top receptacle.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 01:13 PM
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Two solid black wires, one with a colored stripe, and the ground. Replacing the breaker and connecting to a 12/2 at the receptable end would be the easiest since the wire is already in place. The way my kitchen is set up I don't have an outlet I can easily tap into for the countertop cooktop. I would have to remove some exterior siding in order to run new wiring into the base cabinet.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 01:24 PM
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Sounds like old SE cable.

I would run a new circuit or jump off the small appliance countertop circuit.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 01:47 PM
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Okay thanks for your help.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 02:11 PM
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What is the closest counter top receptacle to it? You should be able to drop a cable from there through the wall to a new receptacle inside the cabinet. If that will be more then the length of the cook top cord you can run surface race in the cabinet to a surface mounted receptacle below the cook top. Not that hard to do.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 03:17 PM
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Leave the existing wiring there. Run a new 12/2g 20amp circut, gfi protection is not required YET.(i would use it, anyway) The 50a will provide the option to go back to electric some time down the road, just leave the breaker off. This is what i would do in my house!
 
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Old 12-17-10, 04:43 PM
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The 50a will provide the option to go back to electric some time down the road, just leave the breaker off.
It would only be usable as a 240v supply. It could not be used as a 120/240v supply. I would at the very least disconnect and tag at the breaker box. Never know when some one will close the breaker just to see what happens. Wires on the other end should be in a box and taped or wire nutted and tagged. Frankly I would suggest just abandoning it by cutting it as short as possible and shoving into the wall at both ends.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 05:44 PM
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Ray, that is a good idea to install wire nuts on the kitchen end and disconnect the cable at the circuit breaker but I would not "suggest just abandoning it by cutting it as short as possible and shoving into the wall at both ends." because some gas ranges (higher priced models have electric ovens. The ovens ARE 240 volt only units so this cable would be fine for a "dual fuel" range.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 06:32 PM
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I was suggesting leaving the receptacle there, too. If I would ever build a house, I would run gas and electric lines.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 06:41 PM
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some gas ranges (higher priced models have electric ovens. The ovens ARE 240 volt only units so this cable would be fine for a "dual fuel" range.
Good points guys. Since this was a cook top I wasn't thinking of an oven in the future. Also since it was a cook top I was thinking hard wired, no receptacle but things change so good idea to leave it.
 
  #16  
Old 12-18-10, 12:03 AM
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Originally Posted by phoebers View Post
Two solid black wires, one with a colored stripe, and the ground.
Could OP come from this 220v, 50a receptacle to make a new 120v 20a? Would be a shorter route if code compliant. I'm assuming the colored stripe wire is neutral.
 
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Old 12-18-10, 07:44 AM
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He probably has 2 conductor +ground se cable, with a 8-50 receptacle.
 
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Old 12-18-10, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by tacticaltal View Post
Could OP come from this 220v, 50a receptacle to make a new 120v 20a? Would be a shorter route if code compliant. I'm assuming the colored stripe wire is neutral.
He has no white wire for neutral. NEC code does not permit remarking wires #6 or smaller so he can't use one of the wires as neutral and mark it with tape. Of course local AHJ has final say and might look the other way. Best not to though.
 
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