Pliers met ground and hot wire

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  #1  
Old 12-18-10, 12:14 AM
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Pliers met ground and hot wire

Ok so I was running a ground into the main panel and was moving the ground wire with needle nose pliers. Well one of the black wire must have had a bare spot on it because POOF fireball, I threw the pliers which now have a small chunck missing. Luckily they were good electrician ones with rubber handles. OK, now I will always be shutting the main when I work in there. Have done this hundred times with no problem.

Now my questions is... to fix this bare spot.. can I just tape it?
 
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Old 12-18-10, 12:24 AM
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You need to look carefully at the wires to see if they've been burned by the spark. If so, you should snip it at that spot, and run a pigtail (if needed) to the breaker. If it's just a matter of the insulation being compromised, with no wire damage, you can tape it, but use about 4 turns of the tape.

Now, why were you running a ground wire in the panel? Were you providing an ungrounded receptacle with a ground?
 
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Old 12-18-10, 04:36 AM
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You can't run separate grounding wires to your receptacles in order to make it a 3 wire system, unless it is in conduit. As noted in another post, you can protect the receptacles at the beginning of a run with a GFCI receptacle and run everything downline from the Load side of the GFCI. You'll mark the cover plates of the downline receptacles with the provided stickers in the GFCI, showing GFCI protected, and no equipment grounding conductor.
 
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Old 12-18-10, 06:43 AM
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It wasnt really a "ground wire". It was a ground from one of the circuit that was already connected in the panel. I was moving it over at the top of the panel to make room for run. The spot on the hot that was bare was right where the electrician striped off the NMB insulation so he must have nicked the wire and I was so lucky to bump it when I was moving the ground around.

Have to take a look at it today now that there is daylight to see what happened to the wire and I am definelty shutting down the main before I poke around up there. There must be a piece of plier welded to it.
 
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Old 12-18-10, 02:13 PM
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Long time ago, my dad cut into a hot #12 wire and accidentally grounded the plier tip at the same time. Man..... made a perfect stripping tool for #12 cable. I still have them.
 
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Old 12-18-10, 02:47 PM
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I always hate it when I cut something that I thought was dead with my Klein's lineman's pliers. It goes BLAM! $35! :'( cry. Has not happened for quite some time so maybe I'm getting smarter.
 
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Old 12-19-10, 04:41 AM
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These posts are a good argument in favor of wearing eye protection. Years ago a screwdriver slipped while I was tightening what I thought was a dead circuit wire. A chunk of it burned itself into my cheek about an inch from my right eye. I've also had car battery explode in my face while trying to jump-start a friend's car, and a capacitor on a circuit board explode when I applied power to the device while testing.

Needless to say, the safety glasses are always the first thing to come out of my tool kit.

Just this week I put a nice gash in my hard hat on a job site, but that's a story for another thread.
 
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Old 12-19-10, 10:19 AM
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I've posted elsewhere, I'm sure, but my Daughter is a Doctor of Optometry in Denver and keeps me in good quality glasses with safety lenses, Transitions, etc. Nice. She also set me up with a pair of what they call "double D's" Bifocal up and bifocal down with a strip of clear in the middle. Really nice for working in panels. You are focused up and down, so you head movement isn't always "kicked" back , especially in the top of the panel. Always in focus. You can't walk in them, though. Too much light changing.
 
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