Lights dimming when table saw used. Prob an easy question

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  #1  
Old 12-28-10, 11:22 PM
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Lights dimming when table saw used. Prob an easy question

Hey all. I'm sure this will b an easy one, but I need to ask as I'm planning out my electrical on my garage. I am newer to this so I appreciate all advice as this is my first elec project. Here's the info: have a 100 a main box. I plan to feed to my 100a subpanel in detached garage(60a circuit breaker in main box) from main box. Subpanel has 6 spaces. I have wires the garage already so that the circuit that the tablesaw will use is only shared with the outlet for the fridge. This circuit b wired to the subpanel w a 20a breaker.
I notice that when I turn on the tablesaw the fridge lights dim while in use. Does this mean I need to run the tablesaw on it's own circuit? All circuits are wired w 12-2 romex. And here's the tablesaw data from the booklet:
110v. 2300 watts. 22.2 amps.

I'm sure the answer is clear but I'm still learning. I appreciate all info. Thanks.

J
 
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Old 12-29-10, 12:01 AM
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Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
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That a bit of wattage of that table saw do that table saw can reconnect to 240 volts ? if so that will be the best move due the size of the motor and if you still want to keep it on 120 volts it have to be on it own circuit due the current drawage get pretty high when you run the table saw and fridge kick on the 20 amp breaker will trip no question asked.

How long the breaker will trip ? it depending on the cut you make on the table saw with dull blade yeah it will increase the current drawage like nuts.

Merci,
Marc
 
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Old 12-29-10, 08:16 AM
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You better switch that saw over to 240v or put an L5-30 receptacle with 10/2g on a 30A circut.
 
  #4  
Old 12-30-10, 02:06 AM
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That's not necessary, Justin.

If the saw is designed to run only on 120 VAC (like mine) it will draw quite a bit of power when you first turn it on, until it's up to speed. Read the specs on it (usually stamped on the motor or a panel somewhere near the electrical cord) to verify what current it draws, but a look at the plug will tell you if it needs a 20-amp circuit. A standard 15-amp "Edison" plug has two parallel spades and a ground. A 20-amp plug will have two perpendicular spades and the ground. The 20-amp plug won't fit into a standard 15-amp receptacle. My 10-inch saw specs at 13.5 amps and it dims the 100-watt workbench lamp when it starts.

Either way, I would move it or the fridge to a new circuit.
 
  #5  
Old 12-30-10, 06:26 AM
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''A 20-amp plug will have two perpendicular spades and the ground. The 20-amp plug won't fit into a standard 15-amp receptacle''
A 20amp plug looks like this:HUBBELL HBL5366C AC Plug NEMA 5-20 Male - Our Item #: 6208, Category: AC Plugs : StayOnline.com
Also, in my area, alot of people just use 5-15 plugs, which is very unsafe, especially when you see a 20a tool plugged into an 18awg extension cord.
 
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