How to wire a workshop

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  #1  
Old 12-21-00, 01:32 PM
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I am trying to determine the best way to wire my currently unfinished basement as a workshop. I have a breaker panel down there with 240V coming in (my heatpump breaker is in this panel). I want to wire it too handle most any shop situation. I have a table saw that can draw 13 amps and a shopvac that uses 7 amps...if I have them both running at the same time, do I need a 30 amp circuit to handle them? Also, would there ever be a reason to have a single circuit carring 240V to an outlet? If so, how do I set up the circuit? Bottom line, I want to wire this shop with the most versatility for future expansion.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-21-00, 02:56 PM
Wgoodrich
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What size is this breaker panel and how many empty breaker slots are in that panel that also serves you heat pump. I question whether you should use this panel if it is a dedicated circuit for you heat pump and not a non service rated distibution panel that is at least twice as large as the amp requirement of the heat pump.

Get back to us and give us some detail of the panel you are planning to utilize to power you work shop. Also tell us if your basement has open stud wall, drywalled ceilings, bare concrete walls, etc.

This will help us help you.

Wg
 
  #3  
Old 12-22-00, 06:23 AM
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The panel has room for 8 - 1" single pole or 16 - 1/2" breakers. My heat pump is currently on a circuit with a double pole, 2" module with two 30 amp breakers.

The basement is completely unfinished. No drywall anywhere. All the walls are minimum 2x4 stud walls.
 
  #4  
Old 12-22-00, 11:39 AM
Wgoodrich
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What size is the feeder and the breaker in the main panel that is protecting that feeder to that sub panel. Looks like you should be able to do what you want out of that panel, just making sure.

Wg
 
  #5  
Old 01-04-01, 08:14 AM
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Sorry it has been so long since I replied. Holidays and family kinda consumed all my spare time.

The breaker panel in the basement has 125 amp capacity but the feeder for it is on a 60 amp breaker directly under my meter.
 
  #6  
Old 01-04-01, 02:16 PM
Daved
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Yes there could be a reason to have a single circuit carring 240V to an outlet? My dad has several 240V woodworking tools in his shop, although most of us can get by with 120V. But my neighbor has a 240V outlet in his shop for his arc welder. My 2 cents worth.
DaveD
 
  #7  
Old 01-04-01, 05:20 PM
Wgoodrich
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Sorry, your heat pump will carry most of the ampacity of that 60 amp breaker protecting the feeder to that sub panel.

What size it the wire coming from this 60 amp breaker to that sub panel. Also what size is the wire coming from the meter to that disconnect with the 60 amp breaker feeding that suppanel?

If your wire is big enough we may be able to increase the size of the 60 amp breaker, but only if the wire is big enough. If the wires is not big enough to carry more than 60 amps then your shop and your heat pump will be too much load on that 60 amp breaker.

Wg
 
  #8  
Old 01-08-01, 06:52 AM
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Both the wire feeding my basement panel and the wire from the meter is #6/3. I looked on my heat pump and located some info about what type of circuit it should be part of, and now I have another question. One line stated that the minimum circuit capacity had to be at least 22.5 amps. Right under that, it recommended that the circuit be on a 40 amp breaker. Should I be concerned that I have it on a 30 amp double pole breaker?
 
  #9  
Old 01-08-01, 02:26 PM
RickM
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Cool

Do not be concerned. The 40amp rating of the overcurrent device is a maximum, meaning you cannot put anything larger than it on the circuit. If it runs ok on a 30amp breaker, call it good.

PS. If the nameplate calls for a minimum circuit ampacity of 22.5, as you said, you could run #12 wire to it, instead of the #6/3 you said you ran. #6 is overkill, but is not a hazard. Just food for thought.

Rick Miell
 
  #10  
Old 01-08-01, 04:54 PM
Wgoodrich
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It is very uncommon to find a heat pump rated at less than 25 amps. Most heat pumps are rated 40 amps or more. This must be a very small heat pump.

Please make sure you are looking at the name plate of the heat pump and it says minimum circuit conductor rating and then look for the minimum circuit fuse or breaker rating.

Wg
 
  #11  
Old 01-09-01, 06:43 AM
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Just installed a heat pump--10-2 wire--30amp double pole breaker!
 
  #12  
Old 01-09-01, 09:59 AM
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My heat pump does recommend it be on a 40 amp circuit. What I was trying to say in my previous post is that there is another line on the plate that mentions a minimum ampacity of 22.5 amps. I'm not real sure what that means (I forgot to look and I'm currently at work). I was also concerned that the heat pump is on a 30amp breaker as opposed to a 40amp. For the guys responding about how their heatpumps are wired thanks for the assurance that mine is ok, but that is kinda taking me off track of my original question. Just to re-summarize...

The situation is from my meter a #6 wire feeds into a 60 amp breaker right under the meter. From that main junction a #6 wire feeds a separate 125 amp capacity panel in my basement. (That is not my primary panel...the panel for 99% of the house is in the garage.) The panel in my basement does contain the breaker for my heat pump and it is a 30 amp double pole.

With this configuration, can I wire the basement like I mentioned in my first post?
 
  #13  
Old 01-12-01, 08:29 PM
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Arrow two panels eh?

Telling us you have two panels instead of one opens up some hope, but not much perhaps. Which is the main panel, te one in the basement or the garage (one feeds the other)? Another creative thought as to why the is a 60A main disconnect as an intregal part of the meter base assembly is that other than the ordinary use of them for instances where the main panel is not just simply located inside the structure close to where the meter is, but because the panels each have a cable which goes to the meter. What else does the panel in the basement supply?

Run dedicated ciecuits to the large, perminent, or high demand/specialized equipment in the workshop.
This means all major or fixed machines get their own circuit. Install at least two or more general purpose 20A receptacle circuit that supply nothing other that workshop receptacles.

More investigation is needed.

gj
 
  #14  
Old 01-18-01, 05:37 AM
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I want to first begin by saying that after reading my last post, I seems I may have sounded a bit ungrateful. I am new to the forum scene and if I stepped on some etiquite rules, I appologize.

Now, to followup on what my heat pump calls for, I wrote down what it says on the plate:

Minimum circuit ampacity - 23.0 amps
Recommended Fuse/Breaker (HACR) - 40
Max Fuse/Breaker (HACR) - 40

I guess I still haven't adequately described my situation, here goes...

From my meter a #6 wire feeds into a 60 amp breaker right under the meter. That breaker feeds a 125 amp capacity panel in my basement via a #6 wire. The only thing the basement panel currently contains is my heat pump. The panel for the rest of the house is in the garage and is on its own breaker from the meter.

I now have a specific question about wiring...If I want to have a 220 outlet, what size breaker, wire, and receptacle do I need?
 
  #15  
Old 01-18-01, 11:55 AM
Wgoodrich
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I understand that you have a meter serving a 60 amp main disconnect outside under the meter, then that 60 amp disconnect serves a 125 amp panel in the basement. Now you say the rest of the house is being served by an unknown sized panel in the garage and that panel is served by a connection in the meter.

You have a set up that can get someone hurt. If a fire happened in this house a fireman would shut of the disconnect outside as the main disconnect. Then he will spray water [water bad to mix with electricity] on a house he thinks is dead because you main disconnects are not grouped as required by the NEC.

A structure is allowed to have up to 6 main disconnecting means, but all of these mains must be grouped in the same location. Your discription is putting a main outside and a main in the garage out of sight with each other. If this is true, then you have a hazard to those unknowing working in you home. Even an electrician could be baited in to getting electricuted think on the one main disconnect.

You need to address this hazard first before you proceed. Suggest installing a main disconnect next to the 60 amp main disconnect that will serve your second main in your garage. This would make them grouped. Be sure to mark them as mains.

Your question concerning you 220 circuit is open to unlimited answers. You must tell us the name plate rating or expected use of that 220 volt circuit before we can tell you the wire size required or even the receptacle configuration needed.

Be Careful

Wg
 
  #16  
Old 01-20-01, 09:15 AM
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There I go again confusing everyone about how my house is wired. The panel in the garage is setup like the one in the basement. I was referring to it as my main panel because that is where the majority of the house circuits are located. In fact, it is not my "main" panel. I have only one main panel and it is outside, under the meter.
 
  #17  
Old 01-20-01, 10:16 AM
Wgoodrich
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You said in your first post;

I have a breaker panel down there with 240V coming in (my heatpump breaker is in this panel).

You said in your second post;

The basement is completely unfinished. No drywall anywhere. All the walls are minimum 2x4 stud walls.

You said in your third post;

The breaker panel in the basement has 125 amp capacity but the feeder for it is on a 60 amp breaker directly under my meter.

You said in your fourth post;

Both the wire feeding my basement panel and the wire from the meter is #6/3.

You said in your fifth post;

The situation is from my meter a #6 wire feeds into a 60 amp breaker right under the meter. From that main junction a #6 wire feeds a separate 125 amp capacity panel in my basement. (That is not my primary panel...the panel for 99% of the house is in the garage.)

You said in your sixth post;

From my meter a #6 wire feeds into a 60 amp breaker right under the meter. That breaker feeds a 125 amp capacity panel in my basement via a #6 wire. The only thing the basement panel currently contains is my heat pump. The panel for the rest of the house is in the garage and is on its own breaker from the meter.


You said in your seventh post;

The panel in the garage is setup like the one in the basement. I was referring to it as my main panel because that is where the majority of the house circuits are located. In fact, it is not my "main" panel. I have only one main panel and it is outside, under the meter.



I suggest you discribe the main panel size and configuration, the feeder size going to the main sub panel in the garage, and how many wires you have under the same lugs and where if more than one in any of these main or sub panels. Then we may be able to get a total picture of your service design without the piece meal type info we have been receiving that is causing confusion.

I am concerned whether your main service is large enough in amps to do what you desire. I also noticed the 60 amp feeder serving the 125 amp subpanel in the basement. This causes us to need a total picture in detail of your confusing service design including details of panel sizes, number of circuit capacity in each panel and size of feeders from the weather head, through the meter through the main service panel to the end of line at all sub panels serving this dwelling. This detailed info will give us the knowledge of you service design allowing us to better help you accurately.

Good Luck

Wg
 
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