Damaged 240V electric stove feed wire in wall

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  #1  
Old 01-01-11, 09:27 PM
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Damaged 240V electric stove feed wire in wall

I purchased a new over the stove microwave and in the process of cutting the drywall to install a new outlet for this appliance, the handyman damaged the 50A 240V line that feeds the connector for the stove. The wire appears to be the SEU 2 wire aluminum cable (6 ga). The insulation for one of the conductors was cut, but the aluminum wire is okay. About half of the bare conductor strands that are wound around the 2 insulated wires were severed. Can I just have this "repaired" by splicing (into a junction block) and adding a new 6-3 wire to new connection for stove or am I now required to re-wire with a new 4 wire cable all the way to the circuit breaker panel?
 
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Old 01-02-11, 05:39 AM
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Welcome to the forums! As with most damaged cabling, any damage must be contained inside a junction box. Such junction box must remain accessible. I would go in the attic (I am assuming that is where the feed originates) install a junction box, make a new run from there down to the stove, using the original cable as a "fish".
BTW, what was he using, a chain saw?
Others may chime in with better solutions, so stay tuned.
 
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Old 01-02-11, 07:09 AM
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The wire appears to be the SEU 2 wire aluminum cable (6 ga).
If you repair the circuit, be sure the circuit is protected with a circuit breaker rated no higher than 40 amps. I would replace the complete circuit if it was mine.
 
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Old 01-02-11, 10:20 AM
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Keep in mind, the handyman should be paying for this, not you. (Chandler, if I had to guess, I'd say Sawzall..)

I don't think you would be technically allowed to do such a repair, since it is an ungrounded circuit (unless this is a straight 240v stove). Also, the fact that it is AL wiring means the new piece will also need to be AL (which IIRC you can't get #6AL anymore) or else you will have to use an approved aluminum-to-copper splice (or else it is a fire hazard). COPALUM is the only method for large gauge wire but only electricians certified by AMP can install them. ALUMICONN is only for 12 or 10ga wire so that option is out.. With the cost of a COPALUM splice, it may just be cheaper to run a new 4 wire circuit if you have attic/crawlspace access.
 
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Old 01-02-11, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by JerseyMatt View Post
Keep in mind, the handyman should be paying for this, not you. (Chandler, if I had to guess, I'd say Sawzall..)

I don't think you would be technically allowed to do such a repair, since it is an ungrounded circuit (unless this is a straight 240v stove). Also, the fact that it is AL wiring means the new piece will also need to be AL (which IIRC you can't get #6AL anymore) or else you will have to use an approved aluminum-to-copper splice (or else it is a fire hazard). COPALUM is the only method for large gauge wire but only electricians certified by AMP can install them. ALUMICONN is only for 12 or 10ga wire so that option is out.. With the cost of a COPALUM splice, it may just be cheaper to run a new 4 wire circuit if you have attic/crawlspace access.
I think Polaris connectors would work just fine, but I am also in favor of replacing it with a 4 wire circuit.
 
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Old 01-02-11, 01:02 PM
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This kitchen is actually on first floor of two story house. I am leaning now to replacing with new 4 wire cable. To route a new line, I think I can route in the basement then enter up into kitchen. The new 4 wire cable would be all copper then? And can I get this at Home Depot or Loews?
 
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Old 01-02-11, 01:54 PM
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The new 4 wire cable would be all copper then?
Yes. 6-3 NM-b.

And can I get this at Home Depot or Loews?
You should be able to. You will also need a new receptacle and a new cord set for the stove. The stove will need to be converted to 4 wire. Follow the instructions in your stove manual for converting.

Tech note: 6-3NM-b is three conductors, red, black, white, and a bare ground wire.
 
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Old 01-02-11, 02:58 PM
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Is it required to be copper, or can aluminum be used. Big difference is price at Loews ~ $1.25/ft vs $3.25/ft.
 
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Old 01-02-11, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by GizmottoBob View Post
Is it required to be copper, or can aluminum be used. Big difference is price at Loews ~ $1.25/ft vs $3.25/ft.
It needs to be NM-b cable (AKA Romex). Are you sure the Aluminum was NM-b? If it is you can only use a 40a breaker for #6 aluminum. You'd need #4 for a 50 or 60a breaker. Also you need to be sure the receptacle is co-al rated and use anti-oxidant grease if you use aluminum.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 01-02-11 at 03:36 PM.
  #10  
Old 01-03-11, 02:19 AM
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The only alum cable I used them inside is the SER cable which normally it will be 16mm {#6 awg } but restricted to 40 amp breaker the SEU or SE cable is no longer legit if you try to repair it and per NEC code any repairs it have to be bring up to modern code like adding a junction box so it will automatique go to new codes.

It far muche easier and cheaper just run the whole new cable 16mmX4 aka 6-3 NM cable and use 50 amp breaker and also get a 4 wire range cord as well I know it cost little more but really I think you should let that handyman person to pay the bill for the damage.

Check other wiring in case the handyman try to hide something else which I have ran into few time.

Merci.
Marc
 
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Old 01-03-11, 09:05 AM
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If you have a standard powered range and do not intend to get a fancy one, you can use a 40A double-pole breaker with #8-3/g NM-B copper cable or #6 SER aluminum 4 conductor cable.

If you have a high-end range or may choose to get one in the future, then step up one size to a 50A double-pole breaker with #6-3/g NM-B copper cable or #4 SER aluminum 4 conductor cable.
 
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