SEU wire, weatherhead, grounding of it

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Old 01-04-11, 02:00 PM
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SEU wire, weatherhead, grounding of it

If using SEU non-metallic wire to connect a mains panel to the meter and the meter to electrical utility electrical service (presuming local code permits use of SEU):

(Assume the typical overhead installation... directly through an outside basement wall, up the wall 5 feet to the meter, and then up to the roof to attach to customer service lines.)

Is a weatherhead or similar device used? there is no good reason to require one with SEU (where would the water go?) but do the recent NECs require one? And if so, how is it installed if not using conduit with the SEU wire?

SEU between the meter and the main breaker box is pretty normal, but what about bonding and ground when doing this? Obviously the main breaker panel is where ground and neutral service get bonded, but SEU wire does not contain a separate ground conductor. Does the meter pan box remain ungrounded? do you bond it to the neutral, or do you run a separate ground wire to it?
 
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Old 01-04-11, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by jm949 View Post
Is a weatherhead or similar device used? there is no good reason to require one with SEU (where would the water go?)
Yes you do use a weatherhead and make a drip loop in the conductors outside the weatherhead. The water will wick down through the cable and drip into the meter pan if you do not have a weatherhead on the cable (although this will eventually happen with SEU anyway...). The hot conductors come out through the insulated holes and the braided neutral comes out through the metal hole, which also serves to ground the fitting.



SEU between the meter and the main breaker box is pretty normal, but what about bonding and ground when doing this?
The braided neutral is connected through the center lug(s) of the meter pan which is solidly bonded to the box.
 
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Old 01-04-11, 05:23 PM
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I believe there was a time many years ago when a weatherhead was not absolutely required on SEU. The SEU was bent over 180 degrees so the open sheathing was pointing down and then the conductors were formed into a drip loop. I've seen pictures of an installation like this, but never actually saw one and seriously doubt it would be accepted today. I believe it would have had to be back in the '40s or '50s.
 
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Old 01-04-11, 05:28 PM
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The installation that Joe is talking about is called a gooseneck. In over 30 years I have never seen on in person.
 
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Old 01-04-11, 05:53 PM
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Of all of the weird weatherheads that I have seen, including ones for bx, I have never seen a Gooseneck!
 
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