And This Was Legal How?

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  #1  
Old 01-04-11, 04:22 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
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And This Was Legal How?

While being drug around Pottsville, Schuylkill Haven, Cressona, and Minersville, I have been seeing this alot. There are two to three meters, with the old cloth-like se cable being fed by 2AWG SE cable for feeding two to three 2AWG wires, probably with a 100A MAIN. How was this allowed? What if the total load runs over 100A? There is even a house with this visible from my front porch, and it kinda bothers me.
 
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Old 01-04-11, 05:19 PM
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310.15(B)(6) 100 amps is only required to be fed with #4 copper or #2 aluminum.
 
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Old 01-04-11, 05:30 PM
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While the conductors from the weathhead down need to be sized for the service, the overhead span is controlled and sized by the power company under a different set of rules.
 
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Old 01-04-11, 05:37 PM
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It was 2AWG from the weatherhead down, and 2AWG from 2 to three ~100A services
 
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Old 01-04-11, 05:56 PM
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Under the cloth it probably has type RH insulation and that is good for up to 115 amperes at 75 degrees C. if copper.
 
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Old 01-04-11, 05:58 PM
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Really...Go to 310.15(B)(6). "The feeder conductors to a dwelling unit shall not be required to have an allowable ampacity rating greater than their service-entrance conductors."
 
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Old 01-04-11, 06:07 PM
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The calculated load for each unit may be well under 100A.
 
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Old 01-04-11, 06:20 PM
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"(6) 120/240-Volt, 3-Wire, Single-Phase Dwelling Services
and Feeders. For individual dwelling units of onefamily,
two-family, and multifamily dwellings, conductors,
as listed in Table 310.15(B)(6), shall be permitted as
120/240-volt, 3-wire, single-phase service-entrance conductors,
service-lateral conductors, and feeder conductors
that serve as the main power feeder to each dwelling unit
and are installed in raceway or cable with or without an
equipment grounding conductor. For application of this section,
the main power feeder shall be the feeder between the
main disconnect and the panelboard that supplies, either by
branch circuits or by feeders, or both, all loads that are part
or associated with the dwelling unit. The feeder conductors
to a dwelling unit shall not be required to have an allowable
ampacity rating greater than their service-entrance conductors.
The grounded conductor shall be permitted to be
smaller than the ungrounded conductors, provided the requirements
of 215.2, 220.61, and 230.42 are met."
 
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Old 01-04-11, 06:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
"(6) 120/240-Volt, 3-Wire, Single-Phase Dwelling Services
and Feeders. For individual dwelling units of onefamily,
two-family, and multifamily dwellings, conductors,
as listed in Table 310.15(B)(6), shall be permitted as
120/240-volt, 3-wire, single-phase service-entrance conductors,
service-lateral conductors, and feeder conductors
that serve as the main power feeder to each dwelling unit
and are installed in raceway or cable with or without an
equipment grounding conductor. For application of this section,
the main power feeder shall be the feeder between the
main disconnect and the panelboard that supplies, either by
branch circuits or by feeders, or both, all loads that are part
or associated with the dwelling unit. The feeder conductors
to a dwelling unit shall not be required to have an allowable
ampacity rating greater than their service-entrance conductors.
The grounded conductor shall be permitted to be
smaller than the ungrounded conductors, provided the requirements
of 215.2, 220.61, and 230.42 are met."
Pretty much says it all.
 
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Old 01-05-11, 08:53 AM
Justin Smith's Avatar
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I find It kinda stupid, because if they one has an oven on, another is doing laundry, and another has a couple of space heaters, it can overload the 2awg se cable. No matter what the code says, I would have used cable capable of at least 200A for the services.
 
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