upgrade to 4-wire dryer circuit?

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  #1  
Old 01-23-11, 09:28 PM
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upgrade to 4-wire dryer circuit?

I'm finishing a laundry room in my basement. I was going to simply move the dryer receptacle (3-wire) from its current location to the new laundry room (it'll be a little shorter). My house was built in mid 70's.

Do I need to upgrade to 4-wire (10/3) just because I'm moving the receptacle as part of my remodel? I originally was going to run a new circuit for the dryer but the cost of the 30 amp wire, and the messing around with a new dryer cord convinced me to just use the existing wire (less time and less money). I got a quote a while ago from a pro (part of a panel upgrade job) and he was just going to move the receptacle as well.

I just want to do this right, but I don't need to waste money if not really needed. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-24-11, 05:06 AM
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By code you have to as even though its being moved the NEC considers it changed so it no longer qualifies and grandfathered.
 
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Old 01-24-11, 05:20 AM
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I'd rather do it now than later when you have to dig into ceiling, walls, etc. to replace it when you buy a new dryer which will require a 4 wire set up. The old saying....pay me now or pay me later.
 
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Old 01-24-11, 11:25 AM
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I could still use a 3-prong cord with a new dryer, correct? Either way, I do agree that it makes sense to run new 10/3 cable and switch to 4-wire now.

I haven't noticed any special requirements for an in-wall electrical box for a 240/120v receptacle. I'm assuming I can just use the same boxes (plastic in this case) as my outlets and switches for the laundry room??? Thanks.
 
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Old 01-24-11, 11:29 AM
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I'm just curious, when you say 4 wire does that include ground? We just got a new dryer and it has 4 wires if I count the ground (hot, hot, neutral, ground). Are there new ones with 4 wires plus ground and if so what would the 4th be? Otherwise which 2 wires did older plugs have? Only hot hot?
 
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Old 01-24-11, 11:36 AM
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No, when I said 4-wire previously I meant the cord having hot-hot-neutral-ground wires.

I thought the termininology for dryers was either 3-wire (hot-hot-ground cord) serviced by 10/2 cable, or 4-wire (hot-hot-neutral-ground cord) serviced with 10/3 cable. I may have the termininology messed up. Correct me if I'm mistaken.
 
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Old 01-24-11, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by aabsc View Post
I'm just curious, when you say 4 wire does that include ground? We just got a new dryer and it has 4 wires if I count the ground (hot, hot, neutral, ground). Are there new ones with 4 wires plus ground and if so what would the 4th be? Otherwise which 2 wires did older plugs have? Only hot hot?
Terminology for SO cord such as used on a dryer includes all wires in the wire count. House wiring such as Romex doesn't include the ground wire. So 4 conductor SO cable has the same total number of wires as 3 conductor Romex - four wires.
 
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Old 01-24-11, 02:37 PM
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My advice would be to upgrade the dryer circuit now while you are able to do so without too much difficulty. Just remember to also remove your bonding jumper inside the dryer when you install the 14-30P cordset.
 
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Old 01-24-11, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by kidbat View Post
No, when I said 4-wire previously I meant the cord having hot-hot-neutral-ground wires.

I thought the termininology for dryers was either 3-wire (hot-hot-ground cord) serviced by 10/2 cable, or 4-wire (hot-hot-neutral-ground cord) serviced with 10/3 cable. I may have the termininology messed up. Correct me if I'm mistaken.
For clarification, dryers have never been allowed to run on 10-2 romex. Before the 4 wire (10-3/G romex) requirement, correctly wired dryers were wired with 10-3 plain romex (no ground conductor). The grounding was done through the insulated white neutral conductor. It has never been acceptable to use the bare ground conductor in romex as a current carrying conductor although it was sometimes done. All romex comes with a grounding conductor today.
 
  #10  
Old 01-26-11, 12:59 PM
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That makes sense about the old-style dryer wiring being 10-3 plain (no ground); instead of 10-2/G. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-26-11, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by kidbat View Post
That makes sense about the old-style dryer wiring being 10-3 plain (no ground); instead of 10-2/G. Thanks.
Actually that is 10-3/G. A neutral is needed for the motor and control circuit boards that are 120v. Most driers are basically 120v machines with either gas heat or 240v electric heat.
 
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