Bypass touch lamp control

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  #1  
Old 03-01-11, 12:39 PM
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Question Bypass touch lamp control

I have read DIY posts concerning repairs. There is a mention of eliminating the controller so the lamp is always on when plugged in. However- it appears this may be about a 2-conductor bulb (only 2 wires connected?).
My lamp is a "Sunlight Desk Lamp" with a 4-tube bulb using 4 pins in the base.
The lamp spec is FML-27EX-D 27W 6500K Ra80
I have the base off the lamp now- and would appreciate any guidance before I start cutting and splicing.
Also - wondering if this lamp uses a ballast in the bulb base, or how does it work?
Thanks very much.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-01-11, 05:44 PM
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Can you take a picture of the open base and post it on a site like photobucket and link it here?
 
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Old 03-01-11, 07:01 PM
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If that's a compact fluorescent lamp like this one

http://www.replacementlightbulbs.com/lampfml2765.html

it would need an electronic ballst. Typically, 2 pin lamps use a magnetic ballst and 4 pin lamps operate from an electronic ballast (separate from the lamp) although there may be some exceptions. Some of the older 2 pin lamps are getting hard to find.
 
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Old 03-01-11, 07:16 PM
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Typically, 2 pin lamps use a magnetic ballst and 4 pin lamps operate from an electronic ballast (separate from the lamp) although there may be some exceptions. Some of the older 2 pin lamps are getting hard to find.
The two pin lamps use electronic start, the four pin lamps use electronic or magnetic.
 
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Old 03-01-11, 07:21 PM
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Tolyn- yes, the lamp is at my shop- I'll do the pic tomorrow- thanks.

CasualJoe- yes- the lighting element is exactly as the picure you linked to. Only I paid about twice as much (and may not need the new one!) Definitely 4-pin, as I mentioned in OP. But my main interest is getting it to work :0
 
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Old 03-01-11, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
The two pin lamps use electronic start, the four pin lamps use electronic or magnetic.
Ok, I replied from past experience and memory, but you forced me to do some research.

Plug-In Fluorescent Light Bulbs require a ballast to operate. (See our line of Plug-In CFL Ballasts). The ballasts that operate Plug-In CFL's are generally located inside the fixture. Plug-In Fluorescent light bulb ballasts are designed to run a specific wattage of Plug-In CFL, thus you may only use the wattage of Plug-In Fluorescent light bulb that the fixture was designed for. Plug-In Fluorescents with 2 pins operate on magnetic ballasts, while 4-pin Plug-In Fluorescents operate on electronic ballasts. Magnetic Plug-In CFL ballasts are becoming less common and more expensive, and new Plug-In Fluorescent fixtures are all made with electronic ballasts
Plug In Compact Fluorescent: Light Bulbs Etc, Inc.
 
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Old 03-02-11, 04:53 PM
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Exclamation

@Tolyn
Okay- I think I have the images on-line now. Lets see if I can get the URLs right...
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/g...p/Lampbulb.jpg
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/g...controller.jpg
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/g...htLampbody.jpg

I found what appears to a glass-tube fuse near the corner of the pcb-- it shows no continuity. I am not sure if this is a buss fuse or what.
Thanks for the help
 
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Old 03-02-11, 05:15 PM
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The board contains the ballast as well as the touch sensor. so, to answer your question-NO Also, shouldnt that lamp be grounded?
 
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Old 03-02-11, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
The board contains the ballast as well as the touch sensor. so, to answer your question-NO Also, shouldnt that lamp be grounded?
Interesting point... there is a ground lead from the controller to the lamp base housing, but the power plug is 2- blades.
 
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Old 03-02-11, 05:29 PM
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Dear Justin..

I feel pretty dumb--- Answer to who's question, and what was the question?
At least you made it clear- the answer is "no"
 

Last edited by RegH; 03-02-11 at 05:34 PM. Reason: Added Justin's name
  #11  
Old 03-02-11, 06:43 PM
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I think you found your problem in your 2nd pict. It looks like a fuse and if I am not mistaken the board is even labeled "fuse" No continuity would indicate a bad fuse.
 
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Old 03-02-11, 06:55 PM
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Also, shouldnt that lamp be grounded?
I'm not sure I have ever seen a lamp with a 3-wire lampcord and a grounding plug.
 
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Old 03-02-11, 07:43 PM
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CasualJoe
I'm not sure I have ever seen a lamp with a 3-wire lampcord and a grounding plug
I have, in hotels, hospital waiting rooms, and lamps that I wired.
 
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Old 03-03-11, 12:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
I have, in hotels, hospital waiting rooms, and lamps that I wired.
lamps that YOU wired but have you ever gone to a store and found a lamp with a 3 prong cord for household use that runs on 110. I think you are overly paranoid. Only lights I have seen that are 3 prong for normal household and garage use are 4 foot tube florescent shop lights.
 
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Old 03-03-11, 08:40 AM
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Question About the fuse

Heading back to the shop soon and wondering about that fuse.
Anyone venture a guess what amperage would be about right to fuse that Sunlight lamp?
I am guessing it will be 5 amps or less? (The actual light is 25 to 27 watts)
I am thinking of a test setup where I would clamp a similar fuse to the side of the bad one to see if the lamp will work. If it does, then I would replace the fuse in a proper fashion.

@Justin---
Should I use a 4 or 5 blade plug with about 3 grounding leads? maybe go to 6-gauge wire?
(tongue in cheek)
 
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Old 03-03-11, 05:19 PM
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Most fuses will have a rating on them. This being part of a PCB might be the exception. At 30 watts a .5 amp fuse would be plenty big. If you can't find one locally, Digikey.com is a good place to look.
 
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