Outlets With Back and Side Wiring Feature

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  #1  
Old 03-05-11, 05:48 AM
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Outlets With Back and Side Wiring Feature

I just purchased a contractor pack of ten Pass & Seymour 120V 20 Amp outlets and an additional three loose ones to complete my needs. When I got home, I realized that the three loose ones are both side and back-wired.

My questions are:

(1) It looks like use of the back wiring feature is a better (higher ampacity and lower resistance) connection when daisy chaining outlets, than putting wires under the screws on the sides. Is this true? That little brass link looks like a point of constriction...

(2) Can I use the back wire feature with a wire in just one slot, or should there be a wire on each side of the screw?
 
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  #2  
Old 03-05-11, 06:21 AM
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The bridge between the screw terminals is rated for the 20 amp pass thru. It does not reduce the flow of electrons below what is needed.

The back wired devices can hold up to two wires under the clamp.
 
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Old 03-05-11, 07:15 AM
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Thanks for your reply. Looks like back wiring reduces labor. Is there any downside to the back wired outlets, other than increased cost?
 
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Old 03-05-11, 07:16 AM
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I have the Hubbell version of those backwires, and they are the best wiring method yet. I have them all over my house and they take half of the time to put in. They also have the self-grounding feacture, so if the box is grounded, you do not need to connect a wire to the ground screw.
 
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Old 03-05-11, 07:37 AM
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Under the 08 NEC I do not believe that self grounding receptacles meet the code requirement to be grounded. IMO it seems to saw the EGC needs to connect to the device and not rely on the device screw connection to the box.

Addendum. Self grounding devices are still a compliant method.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 03-05-11 at 12:22 PM.
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Old 03-05-11, 07:53 AM
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Under the 08 NEC I do not believe that self grounding receptacles meet the code requirement to be grounded. IMO it seems to saw the EGC needs to connect to the device and not rely on the device screw connection to the box.
which code sections state that?
 
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Old 03-05-11, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
which code sections state that?
Article 406.3(C)

Now adding charecters to satisfy miminmum length.
 
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Old 03-05-11, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
Article 406.3(C)

Now adding charecters to satisfy miminmum length.
That's interesting, but it isn't in my 2008 NEC Analysis of Changes. I'll check it out later. Thanks for the tip.
 
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Old 03-05-11, 11:00 AM
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(C) Methods of Grounding. The equipment grounding
conductor contacts of receptacles and cord connectors shall
be grounded by connection to the equipment grounding
conductor of the circuit supplying the receptacle or cord
connector.
FPN: For installation requirements for the reduction of
electrical noise, see 250.146(D).
The branch-circuit wiring method shall include or provide
an equipment grounding conductor to which the equipment
grounding conductor contacts of the receptacle or
cord connector are connected.
FPN No. 1: See 250.118 for acceptable grounding means.
FPN No. 2: For extensions of existing branch circuits, see
250.130.
They also have the self-grounding feacture, so if the box is grounded, you do not need to connect a wire to the ground screw.
Ignore that post.
 
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Old 03-05-11, 11:00 AM
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Only part was highlighted in the 08. Perhaps an earlier edition made the change. I don't remember when. I always connected the EGC to the box and the device anyway.
 
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Old 03-05-11, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by CasualJoe View Post
That's interesting, but it isn't in my 2008 NEC Analysis of Changes. I'll check it out later. Thanks for the tip.
That is because it is not a change for 2008. It is also in the 2005 code.

Self grounding devices are legal and do meet the code. See 406.10 which leads us to 250.146(b) (2005 code)
 
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Old 03-05-11, 12:21 PM
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Thanks for the clarification Scott. I will edit my post above.
 
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Old 03-05-11, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
That is because it is not a change for 2008. It is also in the 2005 code.

Self grounding devices are legal and do meet the code. See 406.10 which leads us to 250.146(b) (2005 code)
They might be legal, but they are bad news, and I would question the qualifications of anyone who uses them. Seriously, how lazy or penny pinching do you have to be to not take the extra 45 seconds and a Greenie to hook up the ground wire to the device? 9 times out of 10, the boxes (assuming they're metal) are not going to be set properly for the thickness of the drywall anyway, which means there won't be a solid connection between the device and box. I don't think 406.10 (b) includes situations where there is 1/4" of thread between the yoke and box ear.
 
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Old 03-06-11, 06:16 AM
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I usually use a green wirenut and connect to the receptacle, anyway. The times I do not usually do that is with a 4X4 box, where I connect one receptacle, and the other one gets grounded through the self-grounding feature and the cover.
 
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