Hot Ground Reversed GFCI

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  #1  
Old 03-05-11, 11:19 AM
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Hot Ground Reversed GFCI

I have just recently purchased a new home and I am having some odd electrical problems.

In the laundry room, there is an outlet that has a sump-pump plugged into it. The outlet was not GFCI so needed to be replaced. Once replaced, the outlet tester reads "open ground" so I checked the connections and there was no loose connections. I even checked at the panel and we were good there. Then I plugged the sump pump in to see if it worked and it did not where it previously had when plugged in to the non-GFCI outlet. I then checked the outlet with the sump pump plugged in and it read "Hot/GRD. reversed"!?!?!

The outlet appears to be at the end of the line as it has only one wire coming to it. I cannot tell where the wire goes as far as what else might be on the circuit, however, I suspect a few. Prior to replacing the outlet, there was a dead outlet in the garage (10 ft away) and a dead outlet on the deck (5 ft away) and when I tested other places I found a dead outlet in a bathroom (5 ft away). There is no power to any of these outlets with every breaker turned on. Maybe these all exist on a breaker that is bad? That would mean the outlet in question is unrelated to these?
 
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Old 03-05-11, 11:26 AM
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Hot/ground reversed often means no neutral connection. Check all your connections and make sure that you wired to the LINE terminals of the GFCI.

Sump pumps are generally on dedicated circuits but not always. It is quite possible that the problem is at one of the receptacles that presently do not work. You will need to open the non-working receptacles and check all the connections if my first suggestion doesn't help.
 
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Old 03-05-11, 11:36 AM
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Prior to replacing the outlet, there was a dead outlet in the garage (10 ft away) and a dead outlet on the deck (5 ft away) and when I tested other places I found a dead outlet in a bathroom (5 ft away).
All of these areas require GFCI protection. You probably have a tripped GFCI receptacle somewhere, keep looking.
 
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Old 03-05-11, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by CasualJoe View Post
All of these areas require GFCI protection. You probably have a tripped GFCI receptacle somewhere, keep looking.
I agree. This circuitry would have been typical in a house built in the 80s.
 
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