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Adding 2 Dedicated Circuits for Whirlpool tub...a couple questions

Adding 2 Dedicated Circuits for Whirlpool tub...a couple questions

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Old 03-10-11, 09:06 AM
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Adding 2 Dedicated Circuits for Whirlpool tub...a couple questions

Hello all!

Let me start by saying these forums have been very valuable during my bathroom reno. I am now at the point of doing the electrical for the whirlpool tub pump and heater. They require separate, dedicated 15 amp circuits. I have done some research and much like the OP in this threadhttp://forum.doityourself.com/electr...-gang-box.html have decided for easy and cost sake to install 2 gfci outlets in one box near the tub. I will be using regular GFCI's as opposed to faceless because the tub and heater have regular 3 pronged plugs and the access panel on the tub will allow me to reach the outlets in the case of a trip.

Also, the service panel is hallway outside the bathroom (not on the same wall) so I am planning to run cables up from the breaker box, into the attic and then down into the wall cavity where the back of the tub and the outlet box will go. Are there any special considerations I need to make when:
1) Placing the box/outlets on the back wall of the alcove directly behind the tub?
2) Running cables (was planning on using Romex unless you suggest otherwise) up the bathroom wall cavity into the attic and down to the service panel? (Maybe 20 ft. altogether)

Also, since I can't really reach the top of the service panel (it is set halfway up the interior wall and I can get directly above it to retrieve cables fished through a knockout, but can't really reach it) how should I go about securing cable coming into the box?

Or perhaps you will tell me that none of this can be done and I need to come up with a new plan. FYI, there will be no inspection, but I would like to be as compliant as possible. Thanks so much for your input and sorry for the long post but figured I would be detailed now instead of having to clarify 9 times.
 
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Old 03-10-11, 09:58 AM
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Your plan sounds fine to me. There's no special considerations with regard to a bathroom wall, just make sure not to drill through plumbing. Caulk the holes you drill through the top plate after the cables are pulled through. The code does not require cables to be secured where they are fished through finished walls, just install the box clamp from the inside of the panel so the cable can't pull out.

You could use a double-pole 15A breaker and 14-3/g (black,red,white,bare) cable to a double-gang box in the tub's wiring compartment. The neutral and ground can be shared between the two GFCI receptacles in this case.
 
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Old 03-10-11, 09:59 AM
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You will need to secure the cables to the panel. Some connectors can be put on from the inside of the panel. Bridgeport makes one called the Insider IIRC.

I would install the receptacles under the tub and put a faceless GFI or use a GFI breaker. Newer code editions do not allow the GFI to be under the skirt.
 
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Old 03-10-11, 01:54 PM
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Also, since I can't really reach the top of the service panel (it is set halfway up the interior wall and I can get directly above it to retrieve cables fished through a knockout, but can't really reach it) how should I go about securing cable coming into the box
1) there must be a listed bushing or clamp where the wires go in/out of the box.

2) you must have total access to all of the panel.
 
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Old 03-10-11, 06:55 PM
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I think the Op meant that the panel was installed flush in a finished wall and they did not have access to install a connector in the knockout.
 
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Old 03-10-11, 07:13 PM
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I think the Op meant that the panel was installed flush in a finished wall and they did not have access to install a connector in the knockout.
That would be a good canidate for those push-in clamps, then.
 
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Old 03-11-11, 06:24 AM
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Got some push in connectors and I think they will work great. Thanks for the suggestion. Newest development is when I went to switch off the main breaker to get to work running the lines I heard something spark and the breaker switch wouldn't stay in the "off" position. Well, that's all I needed. I left the breaker in the on position (I had no choice as it wouldn't stay down) and went inside to find that only half the house was powered. I put my meter on the right side of the service panel and was reading 120V to ground...all good. The other side, however, was reading between 6 and 8 volts to ground...not good. I called a friend who has a brother that is an Elec Contractor and they are coming out to look at it today. I think my main breaker is faulty. Talk about disappointing...I was all revved up and ready to run the lines and get that great "I did it myself feeling". Now I'm sitting here waiting, feeling helpless, but there is no way I am touching that main breaker without knowing exactly what it behind that panel, especially since I have already heard it spark once!
 
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Old 03-11-11, 06:32 AM
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I think you made the right decision at this point. You can still know that you did the rest of the work. Unexpected glitches sometimes get in the way.
 
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Old 03-11-11, 01:13 PM
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If you are using NM cable , then clamp a metal NM cable connector minus the lock-nut to the cable , and pull down until the connector threads are "inside" the enclosure , and thread the locknut on the connector.

Here's a "trick - of - trade" if you have to pull concealed flexible metal conduit into the KO of a flush box or panel; "compress" the blank end of a "ty-wrap" under the connector clamp, thread the end of a drag wire thru the "eye" of the ty-wrap , and pull the drag wire and the threads of the connector thru the KO.
 
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