Wiring 14/3 at service panel for new circuit.

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Old 03-13-11, 10:50 AM
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Wiring 14/3 at service panel for new circuit.

I have 14/3 at the panel but I don't 'need' the 3rd (red) wire. I'm sure code is particuliar and i just can't cap it off in the panel.

So if i wired it up as a 240v 2 pole breaker as a MWBC (which I believe is required for a mwbc) so I at least have the red wire connected to something in the panel I could then cap it off at the junction box in the house. I'm not worried about the few extra bucks this might cost i just want it within code and relatively simple. Plus at some point I might want to use the capped off red wire.
This be feeding some outlets in the tv area of the basement which I read from my city needs to be AFCI protected, which would mean I would need a AFCI 240v 2pole when using 14/3.

Is my thinking on track with this option?
thanks in advance.
 
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Old 03-13-11, 10:58 AM
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You can leave it capped off in the panel. As far as AFCI protection goes, im not sure your able to use a 240v AFCI breaker for MWBC. i just saw a thread on GE breakers and the use of handle ties on 2 AFCI single pole breakers.
 
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Old 03-13-11, 11:01 AM
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I'm sure code is particuliar and i just can't cap it off in the panel.
Actually you can. I would tag it on both ends with an explanation but no reason not to do it.

Did you already have the 14-3 already or what.
 
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Old 03-13-11, 11:40 AM
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No problem leaving it capped off.

Only a few brands of two pole AFCI breakers are available. You might not be able to use the red later.
 
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Old 03-13-11, 12:13 PM
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Actually that circuit can be used for the lights, not outlets so no need for AFCI luckily. Good to know I can cap it off with an explantion tag or 2 pole it.

@ ray2047
When the house was built there was a 12/2 and 14/3 run for eventual use in the basement but not connected in the panel and just coiled up in the basement. There is lights and outlets in the basement now that were tapped into the 'mechanical room' (softner and sump) circuit I will continue that for the outlets with an AFCI. The 12/2 for the bathroom and the 14/3 for the lights.
Now that I think about it, I might want to run the sump off the lights or even better yet (maybe) the bathroom circ. If i'm away and the sump kicks on and trips the breaker due to load for some reason = flooding. The 2 least circuits used while away is the bathroom and the lights, least chance of tripping, but if I'm home using the besement it could trip, meaning I couldn't use the basement during rain if the sump kicks in.
I might be overthinking it and need to see the draw wattage when the sump kicks in.
Thoughts?
 
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Old 03-13-11, 12:50 PM
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The 20a bathroom receptacle circuit could not be used in the basement due to code restrictions. A separate bathroom lighting circuit might be ok to tap but a sump pump might cause lights to dim when it starts up. The sump pump would require GFCI protection to be code compliant.
 
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Old 03-13-11, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by wirezcrossed View Post
Actually that circuit can be used for the lights, not outlets so no need for AFCI luckily. Good to know I can cap it off with an explantion tag or 2 pole it.
The code definition of outlet is more than just receptacles. A light fixture or a smoke alarm are considered outlets.

Article 210.12(B) requires all 120v 15 and 20 amp outlets in the following rooms to be AFCI protected: family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms.
 
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Old 03-13-11, 01:12 PM
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The sump was wired by builder and not GFCI protected I believe.
Maybe I'll stick with my orig plan and leave as much of the original wiring and just add my outlets and lights. I doubt the sump will trip based on load.
Thanks
 
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Old 03-13-11, 01:21 PM
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The sump was wired by builder and not GFCI protected I believe.
There is a lot of debate pro and con on this issue. In this forum we advise you to follow current NEC which doesn't permit exceptions for sump pumps. Older versions did.
 
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Old 03-13-11, 07:16 PM
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Based on this, even though I'm adding 2 circuits which I will AFCI protect due to living area, I will also swap the existing builder installed non-AFCI breaker for an AFCI (good safety anyway) and I will leave builder wiring intact and add GFCI to the sump.

From what I'm hearing nearly all new homes built have a breaker box full of AFCI breakers. More money, but still cheaper than a fire.
 
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