Leviton Duplex Outlets

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  #1  
Old 03-27-11, 12:32 PM
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Leviton Duplex Outlets

I bought some new Leviton duplex receptacles.

It has two brass screws on one side and two silver screws on the other side. I know the hot goes with the brass screw and the neutral the silver screw. But on the back, it has four holes (for backwiring) on each side. So for the hot, does it matter which of the 4 holes I use as long as it is the ones on the same side of the brass screws?



Also, is there any significance to line up the wires going to which screw? I see some of the existing wiring done previously, had the hot going into hole #1 on the brass screw side, and the neutral going into hole #3 on the silver screw side. Does it matter? or not?
 
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Old 03-27-11, 12:58 PM
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It doesn't matter.
 
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Old 03-27-11, 01:16 PM
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It doesn't matter, but if those are backstab holes, I wouldn't recommend using them. What do the directions say? Just strip and push/stab the wires in or insert wires and tighten screws? Backwiring receptacles is good, but back stabbing is not so good. What is Leviton catalog number on the devices?
 
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Old 03-28-11, 01:24 PM
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if those are 5320/5320CP receptacles(usually 40-79 cents, take the advice and do not use the back feed....that is rated only for 14 guage wire and does not make good contact. The quick-wire feature was great at one time for people installing hundreds a day but not for the end user. The better 15 amp receptacles like BR15 have a true back feed with clamps that is great, especially for replacements. For new install if you have the 5320's use the side screws ONLY. They are a good receptacle for the money, but the back quicky - feed is not.
 
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Old 03-28-11, 07:50 PM
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The receptacles I am using is Leviton BR15-SW. The product description says "Leviton BR15-SW 15-Amp, 125 Volt, Narrow Body Duplex Receptacle, Straight Blade, Commercial Grade, Self Grounding, Internal Clamps, White". I bought 40 of those and wanted to change out all my outlets except for the GFCI ones.

BR15-SW > Standard Face > Duplex > Straight Blade Receptacles - Commercial Specification Grade > Straight Blade Receptacles > All Products from Leviton Electrical and Electronic Products

You can insert the wire to the back and tighten the screws.

Since there are 4 holes on each side, and consensus is that it does not matter, I am just curious why there are that many holes. I understand for GFCI there is a LINE connection and a LOAD connection, but this is not.

So, if I want to wire a series of outlets, I can connect the HOT to brass "1", connect another black wire to "2", and connect the other end of that to the next outlet's "1", and so on. This would work?

Lastly, the fact this outlet is "self grounding" then it means I don't need to tie a green wire from the green screw to the back of the metal box?
 
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Old 03-28-11, 08:33 PM
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yes, you can wire as you state with a "feed" in one hole and wire going downstream to next receptacle in another hole. this is how I wired all of mine. some do not like this way, the main reason being that a loose screw on a receptacle could cause you to lose power not only to that receptacle, but to all downstream receptacles. for that reason some prefer to use "pigtails" for the black and white. I felt comfortable doing it the way you mention since I was backwiring (the kind that have screws) , but would not do that for backstabbing (the push in connectors-which are only for #14 AWG anyway)

as far as I know you still have to connect ground to the green screw. the "self grounding" probably refers to a piece of metal that holds one of the mounting screws tight and assures a good contact between the screw and the receptacle body. if you screw this into a properly grounded metal box, then the receptacle is grounded. I think you can only use this method of grounding if this is surface mounted box (like you often find in unfinished basement or crawlspaces or garages). I don't think you can use this if flush mounted box (like the boxes in your main living areas) and obviously you can't use it with plastic boxes.
 
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Old 03-29-11, 06:42 PM
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I don't think you can use this if flush mounted box
No, it is perfectly acceptable to also use this feature with flush mounted receptacles as well. Yes, must be in metal boxes and not plastic and yes, the metal box must be properly grounded.
 
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Old 03-30-11, 05:09 AM
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I wouldn't say 'perfectly acceptable'. I would say 'generally accepted as code-compliant but not recommended' - especially since we are talking about receptacles. It is very rare for the boxes to be set to the proper depth that the ears are flush with the drywall. If the ears are backset by any amount, then you are not going to get a solid ground connection between the receptacle and the box.
 
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Old 03-30-11, 09:20 AM
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you don't need to have ears in contact with box to get good connection. that is the purpose of the wire or other metal device that holds the one mounting screw is tight-to assure good contact between screw and receptacle. the thread provide contact between screw and and box.

as far as code, my interpretation of my book-wiring a house, for pros by pros, if the receptacle has the aforementioned metal spring or wire or clip that secures the mounting screw to the yoke, then if mounting in metal box, you can count that as ground. if the receptacle does not have a metal spring, wire or clip, then you need yoke to box contact for ground and to assure this you need surface mount box. or you do like I do and ground them all separately anyway! can't have to much grounding.
 
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Old 03-30-11, 01:04 PM
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..Which is why I said 'generally accepted as code-compliant but not recommended'. Using a "self-grounding" device is nothing more than laziness. There is no excuse for not connecting the ground wire to the device - especially a receptacle where existence of a ground is crucial - and relying on that flimsy connection through the screw. I don't care how anyone tries to spin it, if the yoke isn't touching the box tab (that's what I meant by 'ear' in my last post, I wasn't talking about the plaster ears on the device) and the screw isn't tight, then it isn't a solid ground.

Using self-grounding is the equivalent of backstabbing. Even though it is 'code compliant', all it does is indicate laziness and amateurish work, and it is guaranteed to cause problems for someone down the road. Just don't do it.
 
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Old 03-30-11, 02:17 PM
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I agree. have never NOT put a separate ground wire to a switch or receptacle. If you are doing the work yourself in your home, why not take the extra few minutes to do a proper ground. it is for your own, and your family's, safety after all!
 
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Old 03-30-11, 07:28 PM
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..Which is why I said 'generally accepted as code-compliant but not recommended'
Sorry, but I disagree. I'd call it widely accepted as code compliant and widely used by professionals in the trade, but the box cannot be set back more than 1/4" from the finished mounting surface.
 
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Old 03-30-11, 07:59 PM
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note that you mention "professionals in the trade". time is money for them. as long as it meets code, that is fine for some professionals. they probably bid on job or gave proposal so the quicker they can get it done the quicker they can get to next job. this is probably more commericial work now since I think that most residential homes likely use plastic boxes? I did on my addition. I like them better. except in unfinished basement and in crawlspace. used large metal boxes for splices. remember though, the op is talking about home, so as I said before, in your home, take the extra few minutes and add ground wire. I take every step possible for safety. i pre-twist connections so even if wire nut were to break I still have connection. I tape over all wire nuts so if nut breaks, it can't come off. and I tape over all my screws on receptacles and switches to try to avoid them coming in contact with ground wire (or if metal box coming into contact with box). these extra few minutes are worth it to me.

one important point to add-if you are not going to run separate ground wire, remove any plastic or paper washer that may be holding the mounting screw to the switch or receptacle. those prevent yoke to box contact.
 
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Old 03-30-11, 11:19 PM
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Originally Posted by CasualJoe View Post
Sorry, but I disagree. I'd call it widely accepted as code compliant and widely used by professionals in the trade, but the box cannot be set back more than 1/4" from the finished mounting surface.
I highly doubt that the 30 seconds or so per device that it takes to wire it properly offsets the extra cost of a self-grounding device. Like I said, IMO it's the equivalent of backstabbing, and all it does is guarantee that there's going to be problems with it somewhere down the road.
 
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Old 03-31-11, 09:43 AM
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The customers that choose contractors based only on the lowest bid don't care about long term quality, so why should they get it? If it works at final inspection and checkout, they got what they paid for. If they want better grounding practices it should be written in the plan, but if it says "code minimum" that's what they get.
 
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Old 03-31-11, 09:49 AM
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That's why I asked the question. I too am not too comfortable with the "self grounding" and I had no idea what it meant until it was explained a few posts higher. I will go with the green wire to my box.

For all I know, someone may be taking out the outlet a few years from now, dropped the screws on the floor can't find it but decided to use a nylon screw they have around, who knows...
 
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Old 03-31-11, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
The customers that choose contractors based only on the lowest bid don't care about long term quality, so why should they get it? If it works at final inspection and checkout, they got what they paid for. If they want better grounding practices it should be written in the plan, but if it says "code minimum" that's what they get.
ids,
You missed the point of what I said.. If a contractor uses these self grounding devices and still underbids, he's screwing himself. Because the cost of using SG is going to be higher than the labor it offsets. (unless of course he has complete newbies doing the work and they don't know how to wrap a screw).
 
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