Any rules on Power for Dishwasher

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Old 03-31-11, 01:58 PM
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Any rules on Power for Dishwasher

Went to Home Depot, to get a new dishwasher. As they are going through all the possible up-sell items, one was installation. They want $100 for installation, for that, they will attach the 2 water lines and plug it in as opposed to making a direct electrical connection. I've never even thought of attaching a plug to a dishwasher.

Is this a new thing?
Does the receptacle have to go anywhere special, meaning how far off the ground ?
I assume it wouldn't be GFI since you would have no way to get to it?

Any words of wisdom from you guys would be appreciated.
 
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Old 03-31-11, 02:02 PM
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It is common to plug in a dishwasher. The plug usually must be either in the cavity behind the dishwasher or under the sink next to the dishwasher (depends on local code). It is also usually compliant to hardwire the dishwasher, but not all areas allow this.

The dishwasher cannot plug into the countertop receptacles. It must have either a dedicated circuit or sometimes it can share with the garbage disposal. If there is no electric already installed under the sink, you or an electrician will need to install a new 15A circuit for the dishwasher. GFCI is not required, nor is there a required position or orientation for the receptacle.
 
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Old 03-31-11, 02:03 PM
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The dishwasher does not need GFI protection. The receptacle can be mounted in the cabinet next to the DW to allow easy access to remove the plug.

DWs can be cord and plug connected or hardwired. If hardwired a breaker lock is required to be installed.
 
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Old 03-31-11, 03:22 PM
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Thanks Guys, your knowledge is much appreciated.
 
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Old 03-31-11, 03:29 PM
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If hardwired a breaker lock is required to be installed.
Until you mentioned it, I didn't even know of its existence. It looks easy to install, what is the theory behind a breaker lock required if you hard wire a dishwasher? Sorry to keep asking questions.
 
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Old 03-31-11, 03:34 PM
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It's so a service man can be certain the power is off while he is working on the machine. A lock is required when the means of disconnect is beyond the line of sight from a machine.
 
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Old 03-31-11, 03:34 PM
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Most new dish washers have a heating element to increase the water temperture above the normal house hold 120 Deg. SO most require a 20 amp not 15 amp. as suggested with 12-2 wire and a 20 amp. breaker.
 
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Old 04-02-11, 07:37 AM
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I'm slightly confused about Breaker locks. Does this mean that all appliances need a breaker lock if they have the potential to be serviced? I'm thinking A/C, cooktop, oven, dryer, etc..... and not just dishwasher. Do you have to put a breaker lock on anything that one might ever call a technician for?
Thanks
 
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Old 04-02-11, 08:15 AM
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Electricians will usually perform a "lock out" on the entire panel when working on other circuits, alleviating individual locks on the breakers, but some don't and it creates a danger. Similarly you will see disconnects within sight of air conditioner condensing units, water heaters, etc. It is for personnel safety.
Back to your post $100 including installing the receptacle, water line, drain is not a bad deal. BUT, since we are in a DIY forum, you can do it for the cost of materials.
 
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Old 04-04-11, 10:44 AM
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The breaker lock is required for hardwired appliances where the breaker is the only point of disconnect. Most of the other things you listed have a cord-and-plug which the technician can use to ensure power disconnection. The air conditioner should have an exterior disconnect box near the a/c unit.
 
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Old 04-04-11, 12:50 PM
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thanks so much for your reply. That makes a lot of sense to me and as with most things in the code it totally makes sense from a safety standpoint.
My cooktop, wall oven, microwave, and dishwasher were all to be hardwired. Is there a specific breaker lock you recommend for this. Thanks so much for your help
 
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Old 04-04-11, 01:00 PM
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The breaker lock should match the panel and breaker manufacturer, the companies should list this in the load center accessories section of the catalog. You might need to special order if you go through a big box retailer, but an electrical supplier should have the part in stock and they will know exactly which one matches your panel.
 
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Old 04-04-11, 01:11 PM
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I was thinking of replacing the panel (it's an old Sylvania that has a mish-mash of different breakers in it) anyway and there are some doubled breakers for 220V circuits with metal connector arms. My electrician looked at them and strongly recommended they be replaced as he said they tend to not trip/protect as intended. He said one side often will trip but not the other and leave the circuit hot. I dont like to go into the panel, avoid it at all costs and certainly wouldn't replace it with a new one. That is for an qualified electrician and this just pushes me over the edge to get the whole panel swapped out. Thanks for your help on this.
 
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