Hard-wired smoke/CO detector

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-05-11, 09:19 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Great White North
Posts: 195
Hard-wired smoke/CO detector

Moved our house onto a new ICF basement and the city inspector wants a hard-wired smoke/CO detector installed in the basement. The existing wiring that goes to the furnace first enters a junction box (3-wire in, 2-wire out) and then on to the furnace. Black and white wire from 3-wire cable (in) connect to black and white from 2-wire cable (out to furnace), and there is a left over red wire from 3-wire cable that just has red electrical tape covering the end.

The inspector indicated that is where he thought the hard-wired detector should go, but I don't think he's an electrician. Does this sound right, should I just try to hook up a hard-wired smoke/CO detector to this spare red wire?
 

Last edited by pcboss; 04-06-11 at 09:00 AM. Reason: corrected CO2 to CO
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-05-11, 09:34 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,237
My inspector wants it hard wired on it's own circut all the way back to the panel on it's own breaker.
 
  #3  
Old 04-06-11, 07:59 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Milwaukee WI
Posts: 1,338
Originally Posted by rudeboy View Post
...there is a left over red wire from 3-wire cable that just has red electrical tape covering the end.

...should I just try to hook up a hard-wired smoke/CO2 detector to this spare red wire?
I don't know what code applies in the Great White North, but where I live the requirement for new construction is all smoke/CO (CO is carbon MONoxide, the deadly stuff, CO2 is carbon DIoxide, the stuff plants absorb and convert to oxygen) detectors on their own circuit, all interconnected, throughout the house. So my smokes in the basement must also put the 1st and 2nd floor detectors into alarm.

If your code allows, you should be able to use the red/black/white wires as a multi-wire circuit, thereby powering your smoke/CO detector on a separate circuit.

If interconnection is required, again check locally, but I think I have seen some detectors now that allow interconnection by radio signal.
 
  #4  
Old 04-06-11, 09:03 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,588
If you read the instructions for the CO detector it will tell you not to mount them in the vicinity of the furnace. Also the smoke should also alarm the upstairs ones also. It will not do that since it will not interconnected.
 
  #5  
Old 04-06-11, 11:30 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Great White North
Posts: 195
Yeah I meant CO. Anyway, there's plenty of space in the panel so I might as well set these up on their own circuit/breaker as suggested and then I won't have to worry about code violation, etc.
Thanks.
 
  #6  
Old 04-06-11, 12:52 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,515
That sounds like a good plan. Be sure to use a 15A AFCI breaker and 14/3g cable (black red white bare). The red wire is required for the interconnected alarm function to work.
 
  #7  
Old 04-06-11, 07:35 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,385
If interconnection is required, again check locally, but I think I have seen some detectors now that allow interconnection by radio signal.
I just saw some today, Kidde makes them and they interconnect wirelessly.


Kidde Wireless System
Kidde offers the first UL-Listed wireless smoke alarms. With the Kidde Wireless System you can install the safety of an interconnected system without the expense or messy wiring or labor.
Kidde Wireless Product Descriptions
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes