3-Wire Problem in Circuit Box

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Old 04-07-11, 04:28 PM
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3-Wire Problem in Circuit Box

I have one 3-wire going into 2 circuits (black wire into one circuit and Red wire into the other circuit) that are labeled Garage lights and entry light. I need to replace the circuit with a GFIC because code states that all new lighting needs to be on GFIC (finishing my basement), I am using the garage line for the lights in the basement. So the dilemma is do I:
1. just repplace the 2 circuits with one 20 amp GFIC and hook up both red and black into the GFIC or:
2. DO I buy 2 GFIC and replace the two current circuits with GFIC, if so how do I do that?

Thanks for all the advice!
 
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Old 04-07-11, 04:52 PM
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If the cost isn't that much different use a 2pole GFCI circuit breaker. Or after the multuwire split run 12-2 with the first receptacle on each 12-2 being a GFCI feeding the rest on that branch from the load side of the first GFCI. All receptacles fed from the load side of the GFCI should be regular receptacles marked GFCI protected.
 
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Old 04-07-11, 05:26 PM
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If only they made three pole blank face gfi's
 
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Old 04-07-11, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
If only they made three pole blank face gfi's
What? For a 3 phase bathroom? Imagine having to decide if your toilet seat heater is delta or star.
 
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Old 04-07-11, 06:27 PM
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Two comments:

1) If you do use a GFI breaker, it has to be a 2-pole GFI breaker. Two separate GFI breakers will always trip with a shared neutral.

2) Are you sure lighting circuits need GFCI and not AFCI? Just making sure...
 
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Old 04-07-11, 09:56 PM
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I Hoping this is not a typo you say AFCI instead of GFCI ?? that will make the diffrence there if AFCI you have no choice but go with 2 pole AFCI breaker if you can find one and they are NOT Cheap ( not very many manufacters do make 2 pole AFCI's )

If GFCI then the cheapest and easist way is get two GFCI recepaltes and go from there they are cheaper than two pole GFCI breaker will cost.

Merci,
Marc
 
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Old 04-09-11, 11:44 AM
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Great catch! Yes I meant to say AFCI-Arc Fault Circuit Interupter. Ok, so any ideas where I can get one?
 
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Old 04-10-11, 07:43 AM
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A 2 pole AFCI breaker may not be available for your panel. what brand do you have?
 
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Old 04-10-11, 08:33 AM
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I have a cutler-hammer panel
 
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Old 04-10-11, 09:01 AM
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Why not just buy 1 AFCI and hook both circuits into it?
 
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Old 04-10-11, 09:37 AM
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Which panel form cutler-hammer do you have? They have a couple.
For br, BR220AF
 
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Old 04-10-11, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by MSGPOTTER View Post
Why not just buy 1 AFCI and hook both circuits into it?
Code violation and EXTREMELY dangerous. Using a shared neutral you MUST have the two "hots" on separate legs of the 240/120 volt supply. Doing it the proper way ensures a maximum neutral current of no more than the rating of the circuit breaker on the hot conductor. Paralleling the hots onto one leg allows double the current on the neutral.
 
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Old 04-11-11, 09:34 PM
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Originally Posted by MSGPOTTER View Post
Why not just buy 1 AFCI and hook both circuits into it?

To make it clear here it is not a wise idea to combine it at all second thing ., the ClutterHammer have two diffrent seriés the CH seriés or BR seriés and of course there is a 2 pole AFCI but they are not really cheap what I know and they run near 100 Euros.

before you do get two pole AFCI is this a true MWBC ? If so you are pretty much stuck have to use 2P AFCI if not MWBC then you can get away with single circuits format. then can use standard single pole AFCI they are about 35 to 45 Euros each.

Merci,
Marc
 
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Old 04-12-11, 05:57 PM
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What does MWBC stand for?
 
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Old 04-12-11, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by MSGPOTTER View Post
What does MWBC stand for?
Multiwire Branch Circut - it shares neutral with 2-3* hot conductors.

* for three phase wye only*
 
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