I dissected this and well... umm...

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  #1  
Old 04-07-11, 05:25 PM
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I dissected this and well... umm...

I dissected this cord and it doesn't seem too safe. Replaced with sjtw.
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  #2  
Old 04-07-11, 05:31 PM
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Why are you so paranoid over little stuff like this. Go out and buy a 6 outlet surge protector and take it apart. I bet it has the same metel strips in in.
 
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Old 04-07-11, 05:40 PM
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Why are you so paranoid over little stuff like this. Go out and buy a 6 outlet surge protector and take it apart. I bet it has the same metel strips in in.
I was just bored and found it in the attic. My grandma caught one of those plug strips smouldering, and I had at least two arching inside.
 
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Old 04-07-11, 07:39 PM
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Is it UL listed? What is the max current rating?
 
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Old 04-07-11, 07:51 PM
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UL listed to 13A 125V 1625W A 1000W space heater would probably melt it, however. Plug strip was powering a 20W light, ul listed to 15A, 1875W, 125V. The two I had were powering 4A window a/c, and a radio. the other a 1A printer and other computer stuff.
 
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Old 04-08-11, 07:18 PM
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As with everything in life, there's minimum-approved quality and then there's high quality.

UL listed items go through extensive testing to confirm that they are safe and meet minimum standards. That 13A cord, has been tested to safely handle 13A. There are probably hundreds of thousands of them in use today... and until they are recalled for some reason, there's no reason to think they are functionally unsafe.

That said... minimum standard doesn't mean that's the best option for you. I know I don't buy the cheapest meat in the grocery store, the cheapest tires for my car, nor the cheapest power strip in the big box store. Especially if I'm going to connect it to an air conditioner or other high-draw appliance.

It's often worth spending a few extra dollars when appropriate.
 
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Old 04-09-11, 02:34 PM
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I could easily improve these. The new contact would have another piece of brass to push against the prong, but would still be made out of one piece of brass.
 
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Old 04-09-11, 06:27 PM
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Also, are these cords approved and listed for commercial/institutional use, because I see them used extensively there
 
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Old 04-09-11, 08:49 PM
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Cost is the overriding factor in all things. Almost anything can be made better if cost is no object. And while the NEC prohibits extension cords from being used in place of permanent wiring that provision is routinely violated in residences, commercial, institutional and industrial locations.
 
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Old 04-10-11, 11:05 AM
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Basically it comes down to what kind of mood the fire marshal is in. If he had fun last night, he'll zip through and probably won't write up a cord violation here and there. If he hasn't had breakfast, then he found out his wife cheated on him, his dog was hit by a car, and he had to sit in traffic for 2 hours on his normally 10 minute commute that day, then you can be sure he will be nitpicking EVERYTHING. One of the places I worked at we went through that.. We used cords in a few places for various things (but nothing that could be confused with a permanent installation, like using zipties or wall anchors), so he'd verbally tell us to lose the cords, then as soon as he was gone we'd put them back.

But there was one cord that for one reason or another he never noticed for most of the 7 years I worked there. It was a 100 footer that we had strung out to the loading dock to plug in a radio. It wasn't hidden (it was orange and plugged into an outlet right under the panels), but it was 'hidden'.. But one day he came in all pissed off and went over the whole place with a microscope. We got like 40 written violations for the dumbest stuff, including that cord.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 04-10-11 at 01:03 PM. Reason: Changed some verbage
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Old 04-10-11, 12:44 PM
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Basically it comes down to what kind of mood the fire marshal is in. If he got laid last night, he'll zip through and probably won't write up a cord violation here and there. If he hasn't gotten any in 2 months, then he found out his wife cheated on him, his dog was hit by a car, and he had to sit in traffic for 2 hours on his normally 10 minute commute that day, then you can be sure he will be nitpicking EVERYTHING. One of the places I worked at we went through that.. We used cords in a few places for various things (but nothing that could be confused with a permanent installation, like using zipties or wall anchors), so he'd verbally tell us to lose the cords, then as soon as he was gone we'd put them back.
LOL!

Anyways, are the cords marked "HOUSEHOULD CORD"like the one I dissected approved and listed for use in commercial, institutional, and theatrical use? I see alot at school and stores.
 
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Old 04-10-11, 12:52 PM
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I don't know that I have ever seen a cord marked "For Household Use" or some such usage. It may be that the cords you are looking at have type SJ (junior hard-service) insulation and the heavier type S would be more appropriate in the commercial/industrial/institutional usage. I know that I far prefer a rubber type S (or SO, SOW, SOOW) to the stiff thermoplastic cords that are so prevalent in the mega-mart homecenters.
 
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Old 04-10-11, 04:48 PM
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I mean one like this: Ace 3005089 Indoor Extension Cord, Red 15 Ft
It always confused me why they are marked househould cords, and if they are permitted in other than dwellings.
 
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Old 04-10-11, 07:08 PM
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I honestly don't know but I'm thinking it is just advertising. The "indoor" designation is probably because the insulation isn't specifically rated for weather resistant.
 
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