jbreeggemann Range Top-Al Wire

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  #1  
Old 04-13-11, 06:26 PM
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jbreeggemann Range Top-Al Wire

I have a similar problem. I am installing a new cooktop and found aluminum wiring installed. Two of the wires are coated in black insulation and one is bare.

Can I use the splicer/reducer mentioned below to connect
1. Cooktop red to either black
2. Cooktop black to other black
3 Cooktop White and Green to Bare

Thanks,
Jason
 
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Old 04-14-11, 08:03 AM
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Not exactly sure what your referring to? Another thread maybe??

However, the connections you have listed are correct.
 
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Old 04-14-11, 09:04 AM
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Any connector that you need would have to be rated for both copper and aluminum connections in the proper AWG wire sizes. The aluminum side needs non oxidation grease. Make sure the existing wire and breaker size are appropriate.
 
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Old 04-14-11, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
Not exactly sure what your referring to? Another thread maybe??
Yes, he originally attached this to an '08 post. I think he refers to a Solaris connector. Marc in that post explained split bolt connectors fpr aluminum.
 
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Old 04-14-11, 02:20 PM
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Yes, I meant to have this thread follow an early post on aluminum wiring from 08. Sorry for the confusion.

The connector I was planning on using for all three connections looks like this


So its ok that I don't have a designated neutral wire and a designated ground, it appears the bare wire from the electrical box would serve as both...?
 
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Old 04-14-11, 02:39 PM
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It is a sort-of-grandfathered installation. Prior to 1996, a shared ground/neutral wire was allowed for cooking ranges and dryers; although technically that wire was never allowed to be bare. However, many areas did approve it as a legal installation so it is legal to continue using it as-is as long as the circuit is not modified. If the circuit is modified, it would need to be scrapped and a new one installed. If your appliance instruction manual requires a four-wire circuit, then a new circuit is required. Most appliances have install instructions for three- or four-wire circuit so as long as you comply with the mfr instructions for three-wire circuits it is a legal install.

All that said, it is best (safest) to install a new four-wire circuit, but you are not required to do so when simply replacing the appliance with a new one.

I can't tell from just the picture, but you need to check the specs on the connector to make sure it is rated for both copper wire and aluminum wire in the sizes (awg) that you have. It may also specify stranded (str) or solid (sol) wire which also must match with what you have. Copper to aluminum connections are common failure points, so the details are important.
 
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Old 04-14-11, 02:45 PM
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If you only have a 3 wire feed then your home is grandfathered in so your good to go. If you use a connector like that be sure to tape it up VERY well.
 
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