Need help identifying wires in SJTW-A extension cord

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  #1  
Old 04-15-11, 10:11 PM
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Need help identifying wires in SJTW-A extension cord

Hello, I found an orange extension cord and I plan to use it to hook up a motor, but I need to know which wires are which without cutting into the wire and I don't want to risk damage to the motor with trial and error. One end is male and 3-pronged with a ground and sticks into a wall outlet in the USA but the other end has been opened up and there are 3 separate wires with hooks attached to 2 of the wires.

The extension cord is labeled as 14-3 SJTW-A. The wires are: grey (hooked), yellow (hooked), and white (bare wires). I plugged the cord into the wall and very carefully measured the voltage with a Voltmeter. The voltage across the grey and white was ~124V, the voltage across the grey and yellow was ~124V, but the voltage across the yellow and white was ~0 V or a few mV. The problem is I really don't know what all this means.

Could anyone help me identify which wire is which, or at least which is the ground?

Thanks for any help you can offer!

- John
 
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Old 04-15-11, 10:19 PM
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gray is black, yellow is white, white is green.
 
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Old 04-16-11, 04:47 AM
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In the future you can ID wires like this by using your meter set to read ohms. Touch one meter lead to the ground on the plug. Touch the other lead to each wire until you see zero ohms (or close to it). Now stick the meter lead into the larger of the two slots. That's neutral.
 
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Old 04-16-11, 07:07 AM
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What type of motor are you trying to connect this cord to?
 
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Old 04-16-11, 08:21 AM
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I found an orange extension cord and I plan to use it to hook up a motor, but I need to know which wires are which without cutting into the wire and I don't want to risk damage to the motor with trial and error. One end is male and 3-pronged with a ground and sticks into a wall outlet in the USA but the other end has been opened up and there are 3 separate wires with hooks attached to 2 of the wires.
Just so you know, the U.L. Listing of the cord, if it was listed, has been violated by being opened up, I wouldn't use it. This may not be important to you, but I would connect the motor using the correct materials.
 
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Old 04-16-11, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by CasualJoe View Post
Just so you know, the U.L. Listing of the cord, if it was listed, has been violated by being opened up, I wouldn't use it. This may not be important to you, but I would connect the motor using the correct materials.
Thanks CJ, I should have added that to my post also.
 
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Old 04-16-11, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Rick Johnston View Post
In the future you can ID wires like this by using your meter set to read ohms. Touch one meter lead to the ground on the plug. Touch the other lead to each wire until you see zero ohms (or close to it). Now stick the meter lead into the larger of the two slots. That's neutral.
Grounded plug ends normally aren't polarized. They only fit one way anyway. I suppose the mfr could use polarized prongs to offer protection if the ground is defeated, but I can count on one hand how many grounded AND polarized plugs I've seen.
 

Last edited by Rick Johnston; 04-17-11 at 05:03 AM. Reason: Remove quoted material from above post.
  #8  
Old 04-16-11, 11:46 AM
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Cord

Describe the prongs on the plug.
Do they match a NEMA 5-15R receptacle configuration with 2 flat prongs and a round prong?
Is one of the flat prongs wider than the other?
Do a continuity check from the prong to the colored end to match the wire color to the appropriate prong. When a receptacle is wired correctly, the narrow flat slot is hot, the wide flat slot is neutral, and the round slot is ground.
 
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Old 04-17-11, 05:06 AM
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Originally Posted by JerseyMatt View Post
Grounded plug ends normally aren't polarized. They only fit one way anyway. I suppose the mfr could use polarized prongs to offer protection if the ground is defeated, but I can count on one hand how many grounded AND polarized plugs I've seen.
Grounded plugs also don't have slots.
 
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