Is this code?

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  #1  
Old 04-18-11, 12:32 PM
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Is this code?

seems like a good way to save wire. is it compliant with code in Maryland?

 

Last edited by moveright; 04-18-11 at 12:53 PM.
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  #2  
Old 04-18-11, 01:35 PM
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It is compliant if your jurisdiction follows NEC2008 or earlier. If your jurisdiction follows NEC2011, you need to feed the lights from the switch box instead of through the switch loop as you pictured.

 
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Old 04-18-11, 01:36 PM
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It is correct if you want to power a GFCI receptacle and control a light via a switch. Next question, is this a junction box? Where will it be located? It must be left exposed and accessible. Will the switch and GFCI be in the same box? If so, then all this wiring can be in the switch/gfci box.
 
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Old 04-18-11, 01:57 PM
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Junction box is just a double size blue nail in box with cover plate from home depot.
Junction box is only to house the wire nutted connections.
Junction box, GFCI's and switch are all in different locations.
Junction box will be locate in ceiling nailed to joist, and sheetrocked over.
GFCI's are wired constant and lights will be switched.

I'm trying to figure this out because I have (1) 12/2 wire coming to the new bathroom directly from the breaker. It needs to power (2) GFCI's and (3) recessed lights. I'm trying to do it the most economical way saving as much wire as possible (that 12/2 is expensive!). I's a small bathroom so ceiling space is limited due to the already existing gas piping as well as plumbing.
 
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Old 04-18-11, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by moveright View Post
Junction box will be locate in ceiling nailed to joist, and sheetrocked over.
Junction boxes cannot be covered in sheetrock. They all must be permanently accessible.

It needs to power (2) GFCI's and (3) recessed lights.
Only one GFCI receptacle is necessary if LINE and LOAD terminals are wired correctly.

I'm trying to do it the most economical way saving as much wire as possible
The least number of feet of wire usually is not the best way to run a circuit.
 
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Old 04-18-11, 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Junction boxes cannot be covered in sheetrock. They all must be permanently accessible.
so what if you are running a 50ft run and your roll runs out at 40ft?


Only one GFCI receptacle is necessary if LINE and LOAD terminals are wired correctly.
Oh, so if I want four receptacles in the same box, I can use one GFCI and one regular, then just jump the regular off the GFCI?
 
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Old 04-18-11, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by moveright View Post
so what if you are running a 50ft run and your roll runs out at 40ft?
The best option is to use a new roll and save the 40' remnant for a later project. The other option would be to put in a junction box cut through the wall and put a blank face on it.

Oh, so if I want four receptacles in the same box, I can use one GFCI and one regular, then just jump the regular off the GFCI?
Yes, cable from the breaker on the LINE terminals; cable to the other receptacle on the LOAD terminal.
 
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Old 04-18-11, 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Junction boxes cannot be covered in sheetrock. They all must be permanently accessible.

Hands down, worst news I've had in weeks.

I suppose that is in case of an electrical problem, there will be no non-accessible connections, or at least, to say, all connections will be accessible.

Not that I blame you lol... Just, that's horrible godawful news. well I already have a junction box right next to where I proposed to put this one and that one was to extend wires as well. It was either that, or tear out my whole brand new walls and ceiling to replace a 30 ft wire with a 40ft wire.

well, I guess if you're prepared to ask a question, you ought be prepared for any answer.

So, let's just say that I left the junction box 'exposed', the wiring diagram you provided(thanks) would suffice?
 
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Old 04-18-11, 03:54 PM
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So, let's just say that I left the junction box 'exposed',
No lets not just say it. Lets do it. Get a book such as Wiring Simplified available at Home Depot, Amazon and other places before doing any more wiring.

Cut open the wall at the buried box, install a mudring, and a blank cover plate. The cover plate can be painted to match the surounding surface.
 
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Old 04-18-11, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
No lets not just say it. Lets do it. Get a book such as Wiring Simplified available at Home Depot, Amazon and other places before doing any more wiring.

Cut open the wall at the buried box, install a mudring, and a blank cover plate. The cover plate can be painted to match the surounding surface.
Nothing is buried at present. I haven't sheetrocked yet. what's a mud ring? I was under the impression that the only thing I could do was an access panel which is obvious and looks horrible.
 
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Old 04-18-11, 04:08 PM
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If the box is set to deep to be flush with the surface a mudring is used to extend. Since you don't want use a blank cover plate you need to run new wire or put a receptacle at the box.

I was under the impression that the only thing I could do was an access panel which is obvious and looks horrible.
Not an acess panel a blank cover plate. Maybe you misunderstood. It's the same size as a receptacle plate or switch plate and looks just like them except no openings for receptacles or switch.

 
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Old 04-18-11, 04:12 PM
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roger that. I need to re-plan this wiring.
 
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Old 04-18-11, 06:27 PM
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Take cold comfort that any pro who has worked for any length of time knows the frustration.
 
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Old 04-19-11, 02:23 AM
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I decided to relocate the existing junction box to a wall on the outside wall so that I can just hang a picture over it and it will seem normal. As far as the bathroom wiring plan, I'm going to run the 12/2 from the breaker directly to the GFCI box, then double back to the wall switch, then out to the lights, thus eliminating any junction box. once again, thanks for the pointers!
 
  #15  
Old 04-19-11, 06:30 AM
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If your ceiling has access from crawl space above, then you are good for the J-box just nailed to a joist, open side up. Most electricians tend to use more wire and fewer J boxes.
 
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Old 04-19-11, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by moveright View Post
I decided to relocate the existing junction box to a wall on the outside wall so that I can just hang a picture over it and it will seem normal.
Perfect solution.

As far as the bathroom wiring plan, I'm going to run the 12/2 from the breaker directly to the GFCI box, then double back to the wall switch, then out to the lights, thus eliminating any junction box. once again, thanks for the pointers!
Sounds good to me.
 
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Old 04-19-11, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by moveright View Post
Hands down, worst news I've had in weeks.

I suppose that is in case of an electrical problem, there will be no non-accessible connections, or at least, to say, all connections will be accessible.

Not that I blame you lol... Just, that's horrible godawful news. well I already have a junction box right next to where I proposed to put this one and that one was to extend wires as well. It was either that, or tear out my whole brand new walls and ceiling to replace a 30 ft wire with a 40ft wire.

well, I guess if you're prepared to ask a question, you ought be prepared for any answer.

So, let's just say that I left the junction box 'exposed', the wiring diagram you provided(thanks) would suffice?
One can not truly appreciate the code requirement for all junction boxes to be accessible until one has had to tear into walls and ceilings looking for a hidden junction box because some problem developed or rewiring is needed. I had to do that, and it's not fun. A painted blank plate usually blends very well unless someone is bored and has nothing to look at but the wall.. You can even get clear ones designed to take a wallpaper insert.
 
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Old 04-22-11, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
If the box is set to deep to be flush with the surface a mudring is used to extend. Since you don't want use a blank cover plate you need to run new wire or put a receptacle at the box.

Not an acess panel a blank cover plate. Maybe you misunderstood. It's the same size as a receptacle plate or switch plate and looks just like them except no openings for receptacles or switch.

quick question... Can this blank plate and junction box be located on the bathroom wall? I figured instead of in the other room on the wall, why not put it in the bathroom behind the door. actually, my upstairs bath has one behind the door, now I know why.

so, can I locate it in the bathroom?

also, what's the rule with light switches in a bathroom in terms of location?
 
  #19  
Old 04-22-11, 10:37 AM
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so, can I locate it in the bathroom
Yes. If you are more comfortable with a functional device rather than a blank cover plate you could even put a dead face GFCI there. Run the receptacles off the load side and lights off the line side. A single gang deep box should you give you room enough for connections.

also, what's the rule with light switches in a bathroom in terms of location?
None that I know of but convenience dictates at least one by the door as you enter. A vanity light could be separate by the vanity and the switch at the door controlling central lighting.

 

Last edited by ray2047; 04-22-11 at 11:25 AM.
  #20  
Old 04-23-11, 05:47 AM
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The switches must be outside the footprint of a tub or shower.
 
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Old 04-23-11, 06:23 AM
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If it is in the bathroom, one marked for wet locations wouldn't be a bad idea, in my bathroom everything corrodes quickly even with the fan on.
 
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Old 04-23-11, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
If it is in the bathroom, one marked for wet locations wouldn't be a bad idea, in my bathroom everything corrodes quickly even with the fan on.
You don't need ones marked for wet locations.
 
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Old 04-23-11, 08:02 AM
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Thanks PCBoss. Sometimes I miss the obvious.
 
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Old 04-23-11, 09:10 AM
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You are not the only one Ray.
 
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