Upstairs bathroom receptacle

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  #1  
Old 04-27-11, 01:59 PM
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Upstairs bathroom receptacle

I have an upstairs bathroom receptacle on a 15a circuit sharing at least half a dozen lights and half a dozen bedroom receptacles. Code states this bathroom receptacle to be on its own dedicated 20a circuit, correct? Does this apply to new construction only?

I plan on adding a new 20a circuit for bedroom receptacles however I would like to switch the bathroom receptacle to this new circuit as well. If my town’s inspector doesn’t say anything, is there any negative to doing as such (besides overloading the circuit)? No offense to him, but he doesn’t seem to be the sharpest knife in the drawer.

Is there anything in code that would support my cause? I’d rather not run an entirely new, dedicated 20a circuit for an upstairs receptacle however it’s not great in its current state either.

I should really add, is the local inspector's determination the final say? I spoke with ours and he said some things to me that I thought were against code, like he preferred not stapling romex to studs when inside an interior wall.
 
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Old 04-27-11, 02:20 PM
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You're subject to whatever code your jurisdiction uses at the time of inspection

You're running a new circuit already, what's one more to do this right? Or, why not leave the bedroom on the existing 15 amp circuit and move the bathroom to the 20? That would free up room on the bedroom circuit for you.

You're aware the bathroom need to be GFCI as well, right?
 
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Old 04-27-11, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by mitch17 View Post
You're subject to whatever code your jurisdiction uses at the time of inspection

You're running a new circuit already, what's one more to do this right? Or, why not leave the bedroom on the existing 15 amp circuit and move the bathroom to the 20? That would free up room on the bedroom circuit for you.

You're aware the bathroom need to be GFCI as well, right?
Bathroom receptacle is already GFCI protected.

I actually need to run two new circuits as it is, adding this bathroom receptacle would require a third circuit. The main problem is these new circuits will be run to new receptacles on interior walls, so I can only take so much of the load off the existing circuits. I just don't feel comfortable going through exterior walls given my experience on the subject.
 
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Old 04-27-11, 02:40 PM
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If you can add the wiring from the new bedroom circuit to the bathroom why would it be that hard to just run a new circuit to the bathroom receptacle?

Regardless of what has been allowed in the past, the new work should comply with the current code requirements.

Cables fished into walls are not required to be stapled. Accessible portions would still need to be secured.
 
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Old 04-27-11, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
If you can add the wiring from the new bedroom circuit to the bathroom why would it be that hard to just run a new circuit to the bathroom receptacle?
To get new circuits from the breaker box to the second floor is already a journey in and of itself. The new wires running through the attic will be passing by the bathroom receptacle, I thought it would be easy to just drop a new cable into the receptacle.

Assuming I run a dedicated bathroom circuit, can the bathroom lights be included?


Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
Cables fished into walls are not required to be stapled. Accessible portions would still need to be secured.
I did not realize this. Do "accessible portions" apply to crawlspace attics (i.e. attics without pull down stairs)?
 
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Old 04-27-11, 06:47 PM
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I spoke with ours and he said some things to me that I thought were against code, like he preferred not stapling romex to studs when inside an interior wall.
Maybe the inspector didn't elaborate on how he likes to see cables secured. Staples are not required, but securing is. Maybe he likes these stackers. They are nice and widely used.

Amazon.com: 3M SI-1 Cable Stacker 25-Count: Home Improvement

Here is another method to secure or support without staples.

CADDY
 
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Old 04-28-11, 04:50 AM
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Accessible regarding securing means the cable can be reached and it would be possible to secure it.

If the circuit only serves one bathroom it can have loads like the lights and exhaust fan.
 
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