Electric Range Wiring

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-10-11, 07:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Electric Range Wiring

Redoing a kitchen, recently removed the stove range and found a mess. The stove was wired to a 60amp breaker with appropriate size wiring. How ever only the 3 wire was used (appears to be 6 gauge very thick) 2 black and one uninsulated. The stove was then connected directly into a junction box. One red to hot one black to hot and then the white and green both to the uninsulated ground. How should I go about fixing this? I am thinking of connecting a three prong 220 outlet to my existing wire since it is in good shape, and using a new three prong 220 plug with my new stove. Does this sound appropriate and safe or should I just wire it back like it was since it has been that way for years?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-10-11, 09:25 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
How ever only the 3 wire was used (appears to be 6 gauge very thick) 2 black and one uninsulated.
That wiring was probably not legal even when it was installed because of the bare neutral but is sometimes found in older homes. You best course of action is to install new cable (or conduit) with 3 conductors plus ground.
 
  #3  
Old 05-10-11, 10:02 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,944
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
What is the extent of the remodel in the kitchen, is the drywall open? Are you leaving the range in the same position as before?
 
  #4  
Old 05-11-11, 09:06 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
New cabinets, some moving of pipes. Stove is going bk in same place. Drywall is up but, electrical comes from below. New floors. Pretty much whole kitchen remodel. My biggest concern was the neutral and ground being hooked up like was, may not be legal now but has been that way for long time. Is it safe to put back as it was? If not would I need a new 60 Amp breaker? What size wire, what I have seems to be very thick, I will us a 4 prong since that is code.
 
  #5  
Old 05-11-11, 09:44 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,944
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
The reason I asked is that the existing circuit is grandfathered as long as it is left as-is. I think your case is borderline whether or not the existing circuit would be grandfathered. Usually if the drywall comes down, that constitutes a full remodel which would require all modern wiring. However since you have wiring from below and the range stays in the same place you might be okay to leave as-is.

If you leave it as-is you should put in a NEMA 10-50R receptacle and a matching cord set on the range. These receptacles are "for replacement only" meaning only used on existing grandfathered three-wire circuits. The breaker should be reduced to 40A or 50A. Only really high end ranges require a 50A, so I would advise 40A.

If you choose to install new wiring, you will need a minimum of #8-3/g copper romex cable installed to a NEMA 14-50R receptacle with a 40A breaker. The range would get a matching cord set. If you need to power a high end range, use #6-3/g copper cable with a 50A breaker.

When you attach the cord set to the range follow the manufacturer's instructions for three-wire or four-wire installations depending on which way you choose to go. You will need to connect or disconnect the bonding strap inside the range.
 
  #6  
Old 05-11-11, 05:42 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 10,237
Received 39 Votes on 31 Posts
If you choose to install new wiring, you will need a minimum of #8-3/g copper romex cable installed to a NEMA 14-50R receptacle with a 40A breaker. The range would get a matching cord set.
That's the way I would go.
 
  #7  
Old 05-11-11, 06:50 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If you choose to install new wiring, you will need a minimum of #8-3/g copper romex cable installed to a NEMA 14-50R receptacle with a 40A breaker. The range would get a matching cord set.
I would use a #6 cu on a 50A breaker. I woulr rather overdo something once than redo something twice.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: