Running a new feeder wire to subpanel

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Old 05-12-11, 07:46 AM
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Running a new feeder wire to subpanel

We just began a project to renovate our kitchen. The electricity comes into a breaker panel on the outside of the house, then there is #2 wire coming into an internal subpanel. The subpanel has just two hots plus an unshielded wire. Since it appears to not have a ground, our idea was to run just a #2 white neutral wire and reuse that unshieled wire as the ground now.

When we called an electrician, he insisted he rerun the whole thing (4 conductor wire) instead of just an additional neutral because he said it could cause induction.

Does anyone know what he is talking about? Is he just trying to make more money, or is the proper solution to actually run a whole new 4 wire bundle instead of just an additional neutral?
 
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Old 05-12-11, 08:03 AM
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If it is cable not conduit he is correct. Code requires all conductors for a given circuit to be in the same cable sheath. This helps prevent over heating. The only exception would be a ground wire since it is not a conductor but even that is a gray area.
 
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Old 05-12-11, 08:05 AM
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Right its not in conduit, its just in its own plastic bundle sheath running under the house. Thanks for the confirmation
 
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Old 05-12-11, 08:45 AM
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I have another question related to the remodel. The circuit for the stovetop is 30A, #10 (i assume), and only has 3 conductors (no ground).

I am wondering if I should upgrade this while I am at it? And if so, to what? I've found conflicting info on whether to use #8 or #6 and upgrade to 40A
 
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Old 05-12-11, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by phareous View Post
Right its not in conduit, its just in its own plastic bundle sheath running under the house. Thanks for the confirmation
The electrician is right; the feeder cable should be replaced.

I am wondering if I should upgrade this [cooktop] while I am at it? And if so, to what? I've found conflicting info on whether to use #8 or #6 and upgrade to 40A
Yes you should upgrade that as part of the kitchen remodel. The vast majority of cooking appliances are fine with 40A breaker and #8-3/g copper cable. Very high-end ranges and some double ovens need 50A, but unless you're looking at those cooking appliances I wouldn't worry about it.
 
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Old 05-12-11, 11:33 AM
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Either a stove TOP or a separate wall-mounted oven could be adequately served by a 30 ampere 3-wire circuit (including equipment grounding conductor) IF the appliance is a straight 240 volt one and the amperage draw is no more than 24 amperes. This applies to only separate circuits for each appliance and not for a range.
 
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