Older Stove Wiring Question

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Old 05-27-11, 09:47 AM
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Older Stove Wiring Question

I just purchased a house built in 1996 so it has the 3 prong for the range. The range is wired with one white, one black, and a ground. I found this odd as I thought it should be one red, one black, and a white (for neutral). So there is no neutral only a ground and the stove is connected with the white (as hot), black (as hot), and the ground bare wire where the neutral would go.
Is this a problem? The stove seems to function properly but I wanted to see if I needed to get this changed.
Thanks!
 
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Old 05-27-11, 09:52 AM
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Your situation was never allowed by the code, however many jurisdictions did approve the installation with the bare neutral. You are correct that it should have been black, red, white. You can replace it if you want, but as long as it was approved by the original inspector at construction it will remain grandfathered until you remodel the kitchen. There are a lot of houses with the range installed just like yours.
 
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Old 05-27-11, 12:21 PM
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Is the ground a bare copper or a stranded aluminum conductor? I would have thought given the age of your house the wiring would have been up to the current 4 wire requirements which IIRC pre-date your house.
 
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Old 05-27-11, 04:36 PM
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My range is wired just like that with no problems. I would still like it to be 4-wire, however.
 
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Old 05-27-11, 06:26 PM
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I have seen a few drywers wired like that too, with 10-2/G romex. Just because it works doesn't mean it's right.
 
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Old 05-27-11, 06:51 PM
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Originally Posted by CasualJoe View Post
Just because it works doesn't mean it's right.
But is was right when it was originally installed. The OP's location may have been on an older code than 1996.
 
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Old 05-27-11, 07:57 PM
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I think it needs to be known if this is NM or SE. One was allowed, but not the other.
 
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Old 05-28-11, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
But is was right when it was originally installed. The OP's location may have been on an older code than 1996.
That was more of a generic statement, but considering there was one black, one white and one ground, it sounds like NM cable which was never right by NEC as far as I know, regardless of passing a local inspection.

The range is wired with one white, one black, and a ground.
If what was stated to be a ground was an insulated neutral, then yes, it could have been right at that time, but it doesn't sound like that is the case..
 
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