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How to convert 115 vac reversible motor to 230 volt reversible motor

How to convert 115 vac reversible motor to 230 volt reversible motor

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  #1  
Old 05-27-11, 07:41 PM
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How to convert 115 vac reversible motor to 230 volt reversible motor

I have a 115 vac .75 hp reversible boat lift motor that I would like to convert to a 230 vac wiring, to reduce the arcing in my relays. The motor label shows roughly how to do it but not completely. I could use some help. Please see attached photo, and let me know if you understand how to convert the label diagram into relay logic.

Thanks for any suggestions.

In the lower left corner is the relay logic that I have now for 115 vac, which works, but is hard on relay contacts. Need the same type logic for the 230 vac.
 

Last edited by Rick101944; 05-27-11 at 07:51 PM. Reason: adding clarity
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  #2  
Old 05-28-11, 05:12 AM
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Doesn't appear more can be said that isn't on the motor nameplate. Go inside the peckerhead and move the wiring as indicated to convert it from 120 volt to 240 volt.
 
  #3  
Old 05-28-11, 06:16 AM
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The motor label shows roughly how to do it but not completely.
Whay specifically about the instructions are you having troubel understanding.
 
  #4  
Old 05-28-11, 08:25 AM
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I don't understand what the symbols on the motor label mean. The only way I was able to make the relay box was to do exactly what the manual switch did before which is shown in my little box. I do not understand the motor label as to which connections are changed for forward and reverse motion. All I see is some colored wires in the motor being connected to themselves, and some motor wires that go no where.

I am a mechanical engineer who does some electrical work, like wired my basement. From the feedback so far, it looks to me like the mechanical switch might have been more complicated than necessary, as far as connecting and disconnecting lines. Was it only necessary to make one different connection to control up and down with the 115V system? If so I have too many relays on the 115V system control box. 4 double contact relays emulating the mechanical switch. It has worked fine for a year until one of the relay contacts stuck closed. That's why I wanted to convert to 230, to cut the current in half.
 
  #5  
Old 05-28-11, 11:34 AM
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The leads from the motor are as follows: White and blue are one winding. Orange and yellow are the second winding. These windings need to wired in parallel for the lower voltage and in series for the higher voltage. They also need to be wired in the proper sequence to assist the magnetic field rather than cancel it.

Disconnect the white wire (from the motor) from the yellow wire (from the motor) while leaving the orange wire to the switch intact. Disconnect the orange wire (from the motor) from the blue wire (from the motor) leaving the black wire from the switch intact. Connect the white and orange wires (from the motor) together.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 05-30-11 at 09:31 AM. Reason: Correct Typo
  #6  
Old 05-29-11, 11:23 PM
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If you still want to keep that relay you may want to double check the coil voltage if this is a line voltage verison or low voltage verison { it will be stamped on the relay or model number it will tell us on that }

Just remember that when you do switch over from 120 to 240 volts the white conductor in the cord will NOT be netural anymore so remark them if possible or write the label front of the control panel where the relay is located and marked " 240 volt "

I know there are some relay have 240 volt coil in there. so if you have time to find the relay model number just posted to us we will tell you what is safe and what not.

Merci,
Marc
 
  #7  
Old 05-30-11, 01:16 PM
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Thank you, I need to let that soak in and I'll get back if I have more questions after I study it all.
 

Last edited by Rick101944; 05-30-11 at 01:20 PM. Reason: didn't see all the responses first time...
  #8  
Old 05-30-11, 01:34 PM
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Per your request for the relay info, here it is:



I have 4 of these, including the one where 1 of the 2 contacts stuck. I opened it up and unstuck it, and the lift is working OK on 115 volts, but I am not confident it won't re-stick, hence my desire to lower the current with a 230 volt system. These relays appear to be capable of handling the relay current at either voltage, and they are actuated with a 115 volt coil. I will of course keep the coil actuation at 115 volts.
 
  #9  
Old 05-30-11, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Furd View Post
The leads from the motor are as follows: White and blue are one winding. Orange and yellow are the second winding. These windings need to wired in parallel for the lower voltage and in series for the higher voltage. They also need to be wired in the proper sequence to assist the magnetic field rather than cancel it.

Disconnect the white wire (from the motor) from the yellow wire (from the motor) while leaving the orange wire to the switch intact. Disconnect the orange wire (from the motor) from the blue wire (from the motor) leaving the black wire from the switch intact. Connect the white and orange wires (from the motor) together.
Thanks Ray and Marc. So you are saying that if I leave my switch alone, after making the above changes to put the windings in series instead of parallel, the switch will still do the job of reversing the rotation, with the same wiring as shown in my switch drawing on the lower left? Yes, I realize that the WY wire on the switch side is now 115 vac, the other side of the 230 vac, and I need a new neutral line, and the neutral line should not have to be switched. I'm not asking for a guarantee, I realize I am still responsible for the result, and I will have a certified electrician inspect the wiring before I turn it on.
 
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