When Was GFI first required on pool equipment?

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-09-11, 09:04 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
When Was GFI first required on pool equipment?

My grandpa's pool was built sometime in the late eighties, and I am wondering if I need to try to convince him to buy a gfci breaker for the pump, or if it is grandfathered. The pump is fed from a qo215 in a new panel installed last summer, as the old McGraw Edison one was all corroded, missing its deadfront and too small with the added building. There was never a gfci breaker on the pump, just the pool light, which is now protected by a gfci receptacle mounted next to the panel, as well as a double switch. The entire panel is fed by a double-pole 30A breaker, which is where I personally would place the gfi breaker. I am mainly asking what year the code was mandated.

Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-10-11, 12:00 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,399
Article 680 of the 1975 NEC has several instances where GFCI is mentioned. I didn't read it all that closely but I did see that any cord-and-plug connected equipment had to be served by a GFCI protected circuit. If gramp's pool was built in the eighties I strongly suspect it was not in compliance way back then if it didn't have GFCI protection.
 
  #3  
Old 06-10-11, 12:03 AM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: KS
Posts: 1,896
From what I can find, the pump GFCI requirement (namely if the pump is hard wired) of Article 680 has been in and out of the Code a few times. As for the history it looks like pools were among the first calls for GFCI receptacles in the Code.

1968: All permanently installed underwater pool lighting
1972: all receptacles within 15 feet of the pool walls, and all equipment related to storable pools
1975: All pool lighting
1984: Pool cover motors, and protection distance extended to 20 feet from pool walls
1996: All receptacles in unfinished accessory buildings (includes pump sheds) now require GFCI
1999: All motors in "other than dwelling units", whether plug-in or permanently wired now require GFCI protection
2002: "Permanently wired" motors in "other than dwelling units" now exempt from GFCI protection
2005: "Permanently wired" exemption challenge rejected by board, single phase 240v permanently wired motors now need GFCI
2008: "Permanently wired" exemption challenge accepted by board - all permanently wired motors now need GFCI.


So more than likely if it was a hardwired pump, it was not required to have GFCI.
 
  #4  
Old 06-10-11, 08:24 AM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
The pump is hardwired, and the light is gfci protected, and always was.
 
  #5  
Old 06-10-11, 09:07 AM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: india
Posts: 4
The NEC does not require that you install GFCI protection on "hardwired" pool equipment! GFCI is only required if your equipment is "cord and plug" connected. This is to eliminate or reduce the potential for electrocution during the plugging and unplugging of the motor. Worst case scenario is that someone will try to do this in their bare feet dripping water from the pool.
Although I advocate the use of GFCI's whenever necessary I would not install one on your pool pump that is already hardwired.
 
  #6  
Old 06-10-11, 10:16 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,515
Originally Posted by athena3 View Post
The NEC does not require that you install GFCI protection on "hardwired" pool equipment! GFCI is only required if your equipment is "cord and plug" connected.
As of the 2005 or 2008 code (depending on specific circumstances) hardwired pool pumps do require GFCI protection.
 
  #7  
Old 06-10-11, 12:23 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
So then it is okay to leave as-is. Unless replacing the panel that feeds it counts as modifying the circut.
 
  #8  
Old 06-10-11, 12:26 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,515
Depends on your meaning of "okay". It would remain grandfathered if left as-is, but it would certainly be safer to add the GFCI breaker.
 
  #9  
Old 06-10-11, 12:30 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
Yes, I meant grandfathered. I am still going to try to get him to buy a gfci breaker for in the main panel to protect evetything, although it may (probably)not work.
 
  #10  
Old 06-10-11, 04:22 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: KS
Posts: 1,896
That would probably be the best way. Although you will have to remove all other GFCI devices downstream. As I said, the hardwired requirement was first introduced in 1999, then removed in 2002, Added back for 240v motors in 2005, and added back for all motors in 2008. So yes, when the pool was built, it was NOT required.

Replacing the panel itself does not constitute modification of the circuits (I believe this might've changed in 2011). Replacement of existing devices like a switch or receptacle is not classified as modification (again, this changes in 2011), although replacement of a receptacle in an area requiring GFCI has required it to be replaced with a GFCI since 1993.
 
  #11  
Old 06-10-11, 05:40 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,397
Yes, I meant grandfathered
Justin, in your case, wouldn't that be "Grandpa"ed?
 
  #12  
Old 06-10-11, 07:06 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
Justin, in your case, wouldn't that be "Grandpa"ed?
LOL!

Thanks, all!
 
  #13  
Old 06-14-11, 07:53 AM
electures's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: The Great Police State of New Jersey
Posts: 9
GFI protection for pool motors has been in the NEC for years in one form or another. In the 2008 NEC GFI protection is not required for anything over 20A. In order to answer your question the following information is needed;

1. Year of installation
2. HP and voltage of motor.
 
  #14  
Old 06-14-11, 09:31 AM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
It's 10A at 240V, sometime in the late eighties.
 
  #15  
Old 06-14-11, 10:19 AM
electures's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: The Great Police State of New Jersey
Posts: 9
Hardwired or cord and plug? What is the horsepower of the motor?
 
  #16  
Old 06-14-11, 06:00 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
Hardwired, it uses 9.6 amps at 240volts, single phase, I do not know the HP rating off the top of my head.
 
  #17  
Old 06-14-11, 07:57 PM
electures's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: The Great Police State of New Jersey
Posts: 9
I am trying to locate a 1987 NEC book. I am sure that hard wired pool motors did not require GFI protection. That being said, leave it alone.
 
  #18  
Old 06-14-11, 08:25 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
Yeah, they thought it was grandfathered. I just wanted to double-check to see.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes