Two different circuits in a receptacle 2 gang box?

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Old 06-11-11, 12:28 PM
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Two different circuits in a receptacle 2 gang box?

Is it against code to have 2 receptacles in the same two gang box, each on a different circuit?

I am about to install a thru-wall air conditioner. I am running a home run for the AC unit. The side of the unit that has the power cord will end up right over an existing duplex receptacle. It thought is would look odd to have two, one-gang receptacles right next to each other, so I was thinking of converting the existing one gang to a two gang. But, each receptacle will be on a different circuit. Is that OK?

Also, I was thinking of using a single outlet receptacle for the AC circuit, to help tell the AC circuit from the existing circuit. Would it be against code to have a home run to a single receptacle circuit?

Thanks,
Guy
 
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Old 06-11-11, 12:56 PM
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You may have 2 receptacles, in the same box, fed with two circuits.

In fact you can even have one duplex receptacle fed with two circuits. You are required to handle tie (IE: use a two pole breaker) so that all the hots feeding that device will be disconnected at the same time.

A single receptacle may be fed with a dedicated circuit. If it is a 20 amp circuit, you would be required to use a 20 amp single receptacle.
 
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Old 06-11-11, 01:00 PM
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Thanks.

The unit is a 10,000 BTU unit, with a parallel plug. I was going to use a 15 amp receptacle with 14/2 wire. Do you think that will be OK?
 
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Old 06-11-11, 01:20 PM
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What is the nameplate data? Is the cord end a 15 or 20 amp?
 
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Old 06-11-11, 01:51 PM
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The data says 115V, 8.2 amp. The plug looks like a 15 amp plug, where both blades are the same size.
 
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Old 06-11-11, 02:23 PM
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Number 14 wire with a 15 ampere circuit breaker and receptacle is acceptable. I would probably use number 12 with a 20 ampere circuit breaker and receptacle to be certain of compensating for voltage drop but it is not absolutely necessary. I've run a 10,000 BTU window unit on a 15 ampere general purpose circuit with no problem.
 
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Old 06-11-11, 02:33 PM
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Thanks a million for all replies.
 
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Old 06-11-11, 08:27 PM
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At my old house, everytime the 14,000btu a/c kicked on, I would end up running down to the basement to reset the 15A breaker. Now, we have no problem with the a/c on a 20A breaker.
 
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Old 06-11-11, 09:35 PM
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14,000 is 40% more than 10,000.
 
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