Lean To Shed Wiring Questions

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  #1  
Old 06-13-11, 09:25 AM
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Lean To Shed Wiring Questions

First off, thanks in advance for any advice you might be able to offer. I am looking to turn a lean to into a little better storage area for me. I'm trying to free up some space in the workshop.

I've got a lean to shed on the back of my workshop and it is about a 6'x15'. The door opening is on the narrow end of the lean to (think the long side of the workshop) and is currently without an actual door (I am going to be installing a door though). The workshop has electric service via the house (it has it's own sub-panel in the workshop).

Anyway, I am thinking I would like to install some simple shop lights and maybe an electrical outlet in the lean to so that I can easily see in there without have to use a flash light. I've got a few questions about doing this however so hopefully you guys can help.

1) Can I treat the lean two like a "usually dry location" or do I need to consider it damp.
2) If I can't do #1, is there a good way to install the wiring such that I can have a switch in the lean to for the lights?
3) Again if not #1, anyone have any good recommendations for lighting? The cheaper the better really as I don't need a ton of light out there, but would like something that is safe.
4) I am assuming I will install a new breaker in my workshop sub panel and use GFIC for the outlet and lighting. Correct?

Thanks for all your help!
 
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Old 06-13-11, 10:06 AM
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Does the roof leak or does the wind blow rain in through the sides? If not, then it is a normally dry area.

You don't need a new circuit but can connect from a lighting or receptacle circuit in the shop. The wiring does need to be "protected" against damage and that may mean conduit or something in areas where it could be damaged by tools or supplies (or what-have-you) banging against the wiring. Yes, any receptacles need to have GFCI protection but if you tap off a GFCI protected circuit in the shop that item is covered.
 
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Old 06-13-11, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Furd View Post
Does the roof leak or does the wind blow rain in through the sides? If not, then it is a normally dry area.

You don't need a new circuit but can connect from a lighting or receptacle circuit in the shop. The wiring does need to be "protected" against damage and that may mean conduit or something in areas where it could be damaged by tools or supplies (or what-have-you) banging against the wiring. Yes, any receptacles need to have GFCI protection but if you tap off a GFCI protected circuit in the shop that item is covered.
Well sounds to me like this is a job I can get done in a day. Just need to decide on what type of lighting.

Can I run GFCI through a regular switch? Should I get a special switch just in case it manages to get condensation or something in it?
 
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Old 06-13-11, 12:05 PM
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You can use a regular switch. There are a variety of weather resistant switch covers you can use if you think there might be water spray in the area.
 
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Old 06-13-11, 12:16 PM
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Thanks! The workshop is currently done with metal conduit, so I am thinking I will connect in PVC conduit to one of the GFCI circuits and run it outside to another receptacle and then to a light switch for a couple of lights.
 
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Old 06-13-11, 12:22 PM
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Make sure to include a green or bare grounding wire in the PVC conduit as the plastic does not carry the ground. There may not be one installed through the existing metal conduit system.
 
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Old 06-13-11, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Make sure to include a green or bare grounding wire in the PVC conduit as the plastic does not carry the ground. There may not be one installed through the existing metal conduit system.
How do I ground the lights if I run pvc conduit and boxes everywhere. The lights I am looking at have no grounding wire. Is it something I even need to worry about, or should I just use metal conduit? Obviously the GFCI outlets will be grounded.
 
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Old 06-13-11, 03:01 PM
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If the light fixture is all plastic it might not have a ground screw. Metal fluorescent lights may just have a ground screw or a tapped ground hole marked for you to provide your own ground screw. Some fixtures have a ground screw on the mounting plate/bar if it doesn't have one on the fixture itself.

It is fine to use plastic or metal. PVC is easier to install if you don't know how to use a conduit bender.
 
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Old 06-13-11, 03:15 PM
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It is fine to use plastic or metal. PVC is easier to install if you don't know how to use a conduit bender.
My supply house has prebent elbows for small jobs like this. Thomas and Betts makes them.
 
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