Moving Cold Water Pipe Ground Wire

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Old 06-19-11, 03:45 PM
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Moving Cold Water Pipe Ground Wire

I need to remove the cold water pipe that my breaker panel is grounded to. After I remove the pipe, I am going to ground the panel to the next nearest cold water pipe.

Do I need to take any precautions during the time the old connection is removed and the new connection completed (should take about 15 minutes)?
 
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Old 06-19-11, 03:49 PM
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You night want to add a second ground using an eight foot ground rod first. In some places just a water pipe is no longer code so you will be bringing it up to code.
 
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Old 06-19-11, 05:00 PM
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It is grounded with an 8' ground rod and it is to code.

My question was should I take any precautions during the time the old connection is removed and the new connection completed (should take about 15 minutes)?
 
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Old 06-19-11, 05:32 PM
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If it's grounded through a rod as well...shouldn't be anything to be concerned about for a 15min timeframe. The Pro's will weigh in on whether you should have or even need both.
 
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Old 06-19-11, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by ruauu2 View Post
It is grounded with an 8' ground rod and it is to code.

My question was should I take any precautions during the time the old connection is removed and the new connection completed (should take about 15 minutes)?
If it's to code, I would assume the water pipe ground termination is where the water enters the house and is bonded with continuous ground wire across any pressure reducing valves and/or water meters. To answer your specific question, you shouldn't have a problem.
 
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Old 06-19-11, 08:19 PM
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I am going to ground the panel to the next nearest cold water pipe.
You need to make the connection within 5' of where the pipe enters the house, not the nearest pipe.

The conductor also needs to be continuous.
 
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Old 06-19-11, 08:24 PM
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If you want belt and suspenders,
1. Turn off your main breaker.
2. Add a jumper (i.e. auto jumper cable) as a stand-in for the pipe you are removing.

Plumbers have good stories about removing water heaters and replacing water pipes in homes that have bad utility neutrals.

There is a remote chance that a nearby service with a bad neutral may also be finding ground through your water pipe as well.
 
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Old 06-19-11, 09:20 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
You need to make the connection within 5' of where the pipe enters the house, not the nearest pipe.

The conductor also needs to be continuous.
PC., I thought it have to be 20 feet of contuinus copper pipe to treat as grounding electrode source.

Merci,
Marc
 
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Old 06-20-11, 12:27 AM
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The grounding electrode conductor must be attached to the incoming cold water pipe no more than five feet from where the pipe enters the building. The piping must have a minimum of ten feet (it could be twenty feet, it has been a long time since I checked) buried in order to use as a grounding electrode. Obviously the pipe needs to be metal, either copper or steel.
 
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Old 06-20-11, 09:49 AM
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The 20' requirement is the minimum length of rebar embedded in the footing for a legal Ufer ground. The 10' requirement is how far the metal water pipe must extend into the ground horizontally to count as a legal ground. The 5' requirement is how close the grounding electrode conductor (ground wire) must connect to the water pipe when it enters the building.

It wouldn't hurt to clip a set of jumper cables from the water service pipe to the ground wire while you do the plumbing work you need to do.
 
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Old 06-20-11, 10:51 PM
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Thanks for correcting that one due I am used with French Codés.

Merci,
Marc
 
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