Preparing for DSL

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  #1  
Old 07-13-11, 03:10 PM
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Preparing for DSL

I'm moving into a house that has phone lines, but all have been cut off above the floors and sealed beneath the house whenever new floors were put in. I'm going to be getting DSL through ATT, so I need to prepare for it to save myself some installation costs if ATT did it.

I don't plan on needed a home phone service, so I will just run one homerun line to the spot where I plan on putting my wireless router. What kind of wire should I go with? Just use the standard telephone wire? I've seen some people talk about Cat5, but I'm not sure if that is what I should do.

What do you all recommend?
Thanks!
 
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Old 07-13-11, 03:33 PM
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I'll let the others comment on the cable type but I just thought I'd let you know in case you didn't since you don't want phone service you can get the DSL without phone service and save a few dollars.
 
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Old 07-13-11, 03:49 PM
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You should run at least Cat5. It doesn't cost much more than standard telephone cable (Cat3) and is much more immune to interference. Obviously Cat5e and Cat6 would also be acceptable but probably overkill for this case
 
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Old 07-13-11, 03:51 PM
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Hi.

I had the phone company come and check my dsl for noise. He said it was my line and I should run new. I asked him what to use. He said " Here is a half empty box" He gave me 24 AWG cat 5e with 4 pairs. I guess thats standard phone company stuff. In the case of DSL I am not sure thicker wire is better. Possible the networking gurus can answer that.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 07-13-11, 03:54 PM
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I'll second Msradell's comment. Technically Cat3 wire will work, but you might as well use Cat5 to ensure you don't have any interference issues. You should be able to get a 100' spool at your local big box store. You'll only use one pair (2 wires) out of the 4-pair that are in the cable. Terminate it to a box with an RJ11 (standard telephone) jack. Leave a few extra feet near where the telco will install their NID box on the outside of the house.
 
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Old 07-13-11, 04:16 PM
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Quite honestly, there is absolutely no reason to use category 5, 5e, or 6 for the wiring before the modem. The twisted pair between the telco central office and your home is cat-NOTHING. You can use ordinary doorbell wire if you want, although I don't recommend that.

The main reason why cat-5e or cat-6 is used is that it is common and useable for all the wiring needs. It reduces the inventory in the truck.
 
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Old 07-13-11, 04:44 PM
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Furd I believe its the speed difference. Cat 5e is gig rated. 5 is 10/100 and 3 is 10. And noise is reduced by how its twisted. 1 twist per cm or so.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 07-13-11, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by lawrosa View Post
Furd I believe its the speed difference. Cat 5e is gig rated. 5 is 10/100 and 3 is 10. And noise is reduced by how its twisted. 1 twist per cm or so.
Furd is saying that for ADSL, it does not matter if you're using class 2 cable or cat 6, and in most cases that's correct. When the modem boots it will sync with the DSLAM to the maximum permitted or required. As long as there are enough "bins" available, you're fine. Some systems start you on a lower speed profile, make sure things are stable, and then ramp up over time.

It doesn't hurt to have better cable, because it makes it less likely that YOUR cable is the segment causing the problem.

If you run into problems, always plug in your modem directly at the NID to make sure the problem is on their side, not on your side.
 
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Old 07-13-11, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Furd View Post
Quite honestly, there is absolutely no reason to use category 5, 5e, or 6 for the wiring before the modem. The twisted pair between the telco central office and your home is cat-NOTHING. You can use ordinary doorbell wire if you want, although I don't recommend that.

The main reason why cat-5e or cat-6 is used is that it is common and useable for all the wiring needs. It reduces the inventory in the truck.
I'd have to agree with Furd. My DSL runs on at least 50 year old Cat-NOTHING!
 
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Old 07-13-11, 05:54 PM
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Downstream of the modem you DO want to use nothing less than cable rated as category 5e but between the network interface and the modem it just plain doesn't make a difference.
 
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Old 07-13-11, 06:57 PM
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My modem is being fed by some old wire from the telco that looks like some sjo that is solid, and is supported by porcelain insulators. When it switches to the house it switches to cat 5e that runs to my modem which is mounted next to my breaker panel to make things look neat. There are then cat 5e runs that run through the walls to the rooms.
 
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Old 07-14-11, 03:33 AM
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DSL is designed to use telephone wires. Any cabling that will work for telephone will work for DSL. This is for the "Line" connection only. The ethernet connections from the DSL modem or router to the computers are standard computer connections, and as such should be Cat5e or Cat6.
 
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Old 07-14-11, 08:47 AM
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Thanks for all the replies! So I am deciding between two plans that offer download streams of up to 12-18 Mbps. With that in might I should settle for Cat5, correct? The way my setup should look like is Cat5 running between ATT's NID outside my house and the location I will have my router setup inside my house. For the NID connection I will attach a RJ11 connector on the Cat5. For my modem side, do I wire the Cat5 into a standard telephone jack like this one?

Thanks again!
 
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Old 07-14-11, 09:11 AM
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Again, from the network interface to the modem you may run ANY cable. From the modem to the computer you MUST use no less than category 5e.

The cable at the network interface will be connected by either binding posts, screws or Insulation Displacement Connectors (IDC) depending on the type of network interface. At the location of the modem you would use a standard RJ-11 jack with the active wires connected to the red and green connections. These connections may be labeled blue and white, blue/white and white/blue or T1/R1 depending on the particular jack. You will use a standard telephone interconnect cord between the RJ-11 jack and the modem.
 
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Old 07-14-11, 09:13 AM
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do I wire the Cat5 into a standard telephone jack like this one?
Yes. That is what RJ11 is, a standard phone jack. You could also use a flush mount and an old work box and run the wiring through the walls construction permitting.
 
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Old 07-14-11, 12:07 PM
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I can't seem to find any Cat5, so I will go with Cat5e. So I am connecting only 2 of the 8 wires to the jack, correct? In that case I need the RJ11 6P4C?

I'm going to be running the cable under the house through the crawl space. Is there a certain kind of Cat5e I should get? I noticed at Lowe's/HD that there are several different kinds. The gray coated was the cheapest, whereas the blue coated was the most expensive.

In review so far,

Cat5e from NID to RJ11 Jack. Standard telephone wire from jack to modem. Cat 5e from modem to wireless router.

I only use 2 of the 8 wires, so do I just cut back the 6 wires I don't when connecting to the RJ11 Jack and Connector?

Also, do I need to get a crimping tool for the connector, or is there another method?

Thanks!
 
  #17  
Old 07-14-11, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by msudog View Post
I can't seem to find any Cat5, so I will go with Cat5e.
I have several thousand feet of it in my shed you're welcome to have. Cat 5e will be just fine, it's the newer stuff that everybody uses now.

So I am connecting only 2 of the 8 wires to the jack, correct? In that case I need the RJ11 6P4C?
You use two of the pairs (4 wires) such as blue/blue-white and orange/orange-white. You use the center four pins of an RJ11 connector. One pair goes to the center pins (#3 & #4) and the other pair straddles the center pair (pins #2 & #5). It doesn't matter which is which as long as you are consistent on both ends of the cable.

Pin 1 - empty
pin 2 - blue
pin 3 - orange-white
pin 4 - orange
pin 5 - blue-white
pin 6 - empty

The gray coated was the cheapest, whereas the blue coated was the most expensive.
There are basically two types: riser and plenum. Use plenum if the cable passes through air-handling ducts, use riser any where else.

Also, do I need to get a crimping tool for the connector, or is there another method?
It would be best for you to just get female jacks that come with a plastic punch down tool you can use to fasten the wires. You can then buy off-the-shelf patch cables with the male connectors attached at the factory. You would spend more on a crimp tool than everything else for the whole project.
 
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Old 07-14-11, 12:33 PM
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Don;t cut the extra wires just wrap them around. That way if a pair fails you can just use another pair. The NID will have screws and so should the RJ-11 so no need for crimpers. I'd suggest the cheapest. Solid conductor is easier to wrap around the screws. I'd try a hardware store first for the wire though before I paid more then I needed to for wire.
 
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Old 07-14-11, 06:22 PM
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I'm going to be running the cable under the house through the crawl space. Is there a certain kind of Cat5e I should get? I noticed at Lowe's/HD that there are several different kinds. The gray coated was the cheapest, whereas the blue coated was the most expensive.
You can use whatever you want, it's all the same. It's about 8.9c/ foot at my supply house.

It would be best for you to just get female jacks that come with a plastic punch down tool you can use to fasten the wires. You can then buy off-the-shelf patch cables with the male connectors attached at the factory. You would spend more on a crimp tool than everything else for the whole project.
The patch cables would need to be fire-rated. Also, I just used a small screwdriver and alot of patience to connect the male ends.
 
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Old 07-14-11, 07:31 PM
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The patch cables would need to be fire-rated.
Justin, Why?

...................
 
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Old 07-14-11, 08:02 PM
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Justin, Why
Because he is going to be running these through his crawlspace and walls.
 
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Old 07-14-11, 09:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
Because he is going to be running these through his crawlspace and walls.
No he isn't. He will be running Cat 5. The patch cable will be in the house between jack and modem.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 07-15-11 at 07:47 AM.
  #23  
Old 07-15-11, 02:29 AM
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It is not good practice to put RJ plugs on bulk riser or plenum cable. It is a fail point. It's much better to connect the cable to a wall plate or biscuit.

It is also good practice to conform to the standard color code when wiring the connectors. On a standard 6P4C connector there are 4 pins. 1=white/orange, 2=blue, 3=white/blue, 4=orange. Only the blue pair is used for Line 1 of a telephone system. The orange pair is used if you add a second line.
 
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Old 07-15-11, 06:47 AM
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No he isn't. He will be running Cat 5. The patch cable will be in the house between jack and modem
Oops. I thought he was running the patch cables through his crawlspace. I misread.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 07-15-11 at 07:46 AM.
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