TYING TWO 100AMP BREAKER BOXES TOGETHER

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  #1  
Old 01-04-01, 11:08 AM
Guest
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I HAVE A 100 AMP 12 CURCIT 20 SPACE BREAKER BOX IN MY HOUSE.ALL THE SPACES ARE USED UP.I WANT TO BUILD A GARAGE AND RUN ELECTRICITY FROM THE HOUSE TO THE GARAGE.WHAT I WANT TO KNOW IS CAN I USE ANOTHER 100 AMP BOX WITH A FEW SPACES AND TIE INTO THE EXISTING SERVICE BOX.
 
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Old 01-04-01, 11:22 AM
J
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Yes.
 
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Old 01-04-01, 11:33 AM
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thanks,JOHN. ARE YOU AN ELECTRICIAN?YOU SEEM TO KNOW ALOT ABOUT WIRING.
 
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Old 01-04-01, 01:01 PM
J
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No, I'm not an electrician. But there are several here (e.g., Wg), and I hope they will chime in with a bunch of caveats and other things you'll need to remember when you do this.

Are you planning to do this work yourself?
 
  #5  
Old 01-04-01, 05:12 PM
Wgoodrich
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Might be cheaper to use the unlimite tap rule of the NEC and exchange you original meterbase outside with a 325 amp double lug meter. Then run the existing feeders of you house panel to one set of the double lugs and run the feeders to the garage as long as this garage is not attached to the house. This would allow you the full panel capablilities in the detached garage without running the load through you 100 amp panel in you house. I suspect you are already pushing the capacity of that 100 amp panel in your home. You might want to do a demand load calculation on your dwelling to see what the minimum panel size that is required for you house as it is today, before adding any load out of that panel.

I believe that you should be able rely on what John Nelson has to say. He may not be an electrician but I suspect his training parallels mine. At least when we don't agree on giving a certain advise, we both seem to be skilled enough to know what each other disagrees about.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
  #6  
Old 01-05-01, 09:48 AM
J
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Although WG has a good idea, if I were a novice and intended to maybe do this myself I would be somewhat reluctant to get the utility involved and change out my meter & socket. I might be inclined to drop a 4-space sub-panel below my existing panel and hang it off a new 100-amp 2-pole breaker in the main panel. I'd disconnect two existing adjacent single-pole circuits in the main panel, remove those 1-pole breakers, replacing them with the new 2-pole 100 amp. Then I'd install a 1" conduit between the main and sub-panels, run 2 hots and a neutral of #1 AWG copper from the new 2-pole breaker in the main to "hot up" the sub, plus the conductors from the two existing circuits you disconnected to two new 1-pole breakers (installed in the sub) of the sizes you just disconnected in the main. Include the existing grounded conductors (neutrals) and grounds to be connected in the sub. Reconnect the two existing circuits to restore what you had taken away to get the new 2-pole 100 amp breaker. Install a 60-amp, 2-pole breaker in the sub and run #1 wire to the new garage and install a 60 amp sub-panel out there.

Remember that in any sub-panel you must provide separate neutral and ground buses and connect neutrals and grounds separately to their respective bus bars. Never use the "bonding" screw that comes with a sub-panel, and always sand off the paint completely where the ground bus will be installed.

I realize this is somewhat general, so if you need more info as you go along just stop in anytime and there are numerous knowledgeable individuals here that will be happy to assist.

Also, WG isn't an electrician. But I'd personally listen to anything he had to say about electical work. He's a highly experienced electrical inspector.

Juice
 
  #7  
Old 01-05-01, 11:07 AM
Wgoodrich
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Juicehead thanks for the confidence but had to be called an electrician too for piece of mind, paid the dues in sweat.

Just to put my two cents worth in, I think that I would qualify as both an electrician and an Inspector and an electrical instructor.

I owned and operated an electrical contracting business for 30 years, been in the trenches for that whole time, and have arms like Popye from pulling TOO MANY MILES OF WIRE.

Juicehead, I think you could call me an electrician too, BOY did I earn it.

Having fun yet?

Wg
 
  #8  
Old 01-05-01, 11:46 AM
J
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WG, my humble apologies. How could I have known? But now that I do it makes sense to me who it is that you're more knowledgeable than the average bear.

And yes, we're having fun now. Also, have you had a chance to get together with toolbabe yet?

To everyone else interested in this thread: Sorry there's no electrical stuff in this reply.

Juice
 
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