HOT Electric plug in from Construction fan.

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-01-11, 08:10 PM
DIYslowly's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 106
HOT Electric plug in from Construction fan.

I have a large construction fan maybe 4 1/2 to 5 feet tall. Haven't used it for a year. Plugged it into a normal house outlet today for about five hours. When I unplugged it the cord was Hot. I dropped it and stupidly tried to pick it back up. The prongs were Super Hot. The wall outlet was pretty hot. There is another outlet on the other side of the wall and it was pretty hot also.

There is nothing running in the whole house. Only have three timers running lights at night... nothing else in whole house. Whole house was rewired in 1998 and a new can with new breakers and more power added three years ago. No one living there for those three years.

Fan is 120V, 60HZ, 12 Amp. Typical large construction fan usually used at job sites.

Was very surprised by this.

Any ideas? Will not be able to check back till tomorrow.

Thanks so much!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-01-11, 09:00 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,372
Poor connections. It could be a poor connection in the plug of the fan cord, a poor connection in either or both of the receptacles that got hot. I suspect that the receptacles were wired using the push-in "back stabbed" connections and the receptacle on the "other" side of the wall is used to feed power from the source to the receptacle you had the fan plugged into.
 
  #3  
Old 08-01-11, 09:07 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
The receptacle may also be worn out.
 
  #4  
Old 08-02-11, 04:20 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 9,646
There is a possibility that the problem stems from the plug on the end of the fan wire, especially if it is a molded one.
I would suggest that you cut plug off the end of the cord and install a heavy duty one and also replace the receptacle that has been overheating.

It is common for me to notice warm cord caps on higher amperage plug in devices that are run for extended times when they used molded plugs.
 
  #5  
Old 08-02-11, 06:43 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,365
Pulling 12 amps for a long period of time will cause the heat to build up. It will be even worse if any connections are marginal.
 
  #6  
Old 08-02-11, 09:14 AM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
There is a possibility that the problem stems from the plug on the end of the fan wire, especially if it is a molded one.
I would suggest that you cut plug off the end of the cord and install a heavy duty one and also replace the receptacle that has been overheating.

It is common for me to notice warm cord caps on higher amperage plug in devices that are run for extended times when they used molded plugs.
Agreed. What size cord is on the fan, as this is also a contributing factor.
 
  #7  
Old 08-02-11, 09:57 AM
DIYslowly's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 106
Thanks a bunch... going to switch out plug ins first thing. If I remember right all were done using the back stabbed method. Also have a new cord end handy as the one on the fan is molded end.

will post info as I finish... was 109 heat index here yesterday... fan was a big help.

thanks again
 
  #8  
Old 08-03-11, 09:10 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 563
If you have a clamp on Amp meter it may be good to check to see how much current the fan is really drawing. The bearings (or bushings) in the fan may have gotten dirty during the extended time of nonuse and are causing the fan to draw more current than its rating. You could actually be dealing with a mechanical problem instead of an electrical one!
 
  #9  
Old 08-12-11, 01:05 PM
DIYslowly's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 106
UPDATE

I put a new plug in on the end and cut off the molded one. The wire seems to be #14, I'm not sure when it comes to multiple strands of wire.

I replaced both outlets. This is between the front room wall and an inclosed porch wall. Main wire comes up then pig tails to both separately. Front room outlet was back stabbed... very tightly secured still and a good outlet. Porch outlet was not back stabbed and was a very cheap outlet with a little piece of the plastic below the ground broken off... shouldn't matter there I believe... ground able to easily penetrate fully into outlet.

I replaced front room outlet with a new one and then put a GFI on the front porch outlet.

Was only able to run fan about 30 min to test so far.

Found out one thing that may be important. The off and on power switch ... rocker I believe its called... is stuck on no matter which way you click it. I have no idea if it could cause the heating problem. Also have to find a place that sells that type of switch or replace it with another type.

[Msradell-- no clamp on amp meter.... but a good idea to check to see about lube or oil if possible]

Thanks very much to all
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'