Wiring for range hood - Why a double pole switch ?

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  #1  
Old 08-16-11, 08:55 PM
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Wiring for range hood - Why a double pole switch ?

Hello there,
The installation instructions of the range hood I bought calls for the device to be switched by a double pole switch. The connection to the hood itself is the usual line, neutral and ground.

1) Why does it need a double pole switch?
2) Does such a switch connect and disconnect the neutral wire as well? If so, what advantage does it have?

Thanks
Alex
 
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  #2  
Old 08-16-11, 09:05 PM
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Is there no switch built into the range hood? Can you scan the instructions or give us a link on line to install instructions.
 
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Old 08-16-11, 09:24 PM
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Yes, it does have separate light switch and fan switch (3 speed).
Here's the manual.

Check out page 12 just below the BLACK, WHITE and GREEN/YELLOW definitions for the double pole switch requirement.

Thanks
Alex
 
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Old 08-16-11, 10:08 PM
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I have no idea why it is calling for a double pole switch. It is not necessary at all for this application. A switch isn't required at all for a vent hood with an integrated control, so I don't understand why it even specifies a switch.
 
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Old 08-16-11, 10:33 PM
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From the manual:
A double-pole switch properly rated
must be installed to provide the range
hood power supply disconnection.
Even if local code does require a disconnect you would use a single pole. I never heard of a vent hood requiring a disconnect but I'm not a pro. My guess is the genius who wrote the manual was thinking about fixed 240v equipment.
 
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Old 08-17-11, 05:12 AM
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Thank you, guys! I have added a single pole switch. It is going to be frustrating everytime I reach out and turn the hood on, only to realize that the switch is off. Maybe I'll tape that up in the on position

ps: I hope the lack of a double pole switch will not be used as an excuse by the mfr in case of warranty related issues.
 
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Old 08-17-11, 08:16 AM
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The single pole switch is only used when servicing the unit. At all other times it is left on. If you'd waited a bit the conclusion here might have been no switch. No warranty violation because a 2 pole switch would have violated code.
 
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Old 08-17-11, 08:24 AM
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Thank you. It's a relief to know that.

So, my 2nd question...does a double pole switch disconnect/connect the neutral (in addition to the line)?
If so, what purpose does it serve?
 
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Old 08-17-11, 10:08 AM
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I agree that someone that did not know what they were doing wrote the instructions. I have never seen a range hood with a disconnect switch.
 
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Old 08-17-11, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by AlexWoods View Post
So, my 2nd question...does a double pole switch disconnect/connect the neutral (in addition to the line)?
The neutral is not supposed to be disconnected.

If so, what purpose does it serve?
It would be correct in a 240V circuit where there are two hots and no neutral. In a 120V circuit a double pole switch is not necessary.
 
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Old 08-17-11, 08:12 PM
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If you decide to include a disconnect switch (which if I were installing it, I probably wouldn't), you could put the switch in one of the cabinets so it's out of the way. I'd cut a hole in the back of the cabinet and mount the switch in the wall using a remodel box. Then I'd forget about it and never touch it again
 
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Old 08-17-11, 08:13 PM
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I find a lot of Ikea products and their instructions are for Euro installations, and could possibly use 220 volts. BUT, why have a disconnect on such an innocuous appliance? It would be like installing a light switch ahead of a light switch just in case you had to work on the second one. Doesn't make any sense. I agree with Ray, we could have saved a lot of aggravation if you hadn't been in a hurry. But what is done is done.
 
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Old 08-17-11, 09:29 PM
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Or use a security switch that has no toggle handle. That way people wouldn't be turning it on and off. Probably I am not calling it by its correct name but it is common for lighting in institutional settings. Perhaps one of the pros can provide the correct name.
 
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Old 08-17-11, 09:35 PM
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I always called it a keyswitch.
 
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Old 08-18-11, 04:25 AM
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Same question keeps coming up.....why? You disconnect it at the breaker panel. It's not like it is an air conditioner compressor with applicable rules of disconnect.
 
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Old 08-18-11, 06:52 AM
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Instructions

In looking at the manual from the link above, it looks like the instructions for a range installation and the hood installation are mixed together. Very poorly written, to say the least.
 
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Old 08-18-11, 09:35 AM
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Indeed the instructions are poorly written or not written well for the English language. For example:
Fix the appliance to the wall and align it in horizontal position to the wall units. When the appliance has been adjusted, definitely fix the hood using the screws A (Fig.2).
I think what is meant by "definitely" above is "securely". I will definitely secure it

The product is made in Italy. That might explain a few things:
  1. The translation from Italian to English was done without proof-reading
  2. It's 220v there, so they may use a double pole switch (although they may only have one hot wire)
  3. The guy was watching a soccer game and Italy scored it's second goal against USA, causing him to write double instead of single pole
No offence to my Italian brothers out there. It's all in good fun
 
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Old 08-18-11, 05:23 PM
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Another suggestion: Take the switch out, wirenut the wires together, and put a blank cover on the box. Poof...switch gone.
 
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Old 08-18-11, 09:45 PM
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That's a great suggestion. In this case, however, there was a 1-gang GFI outlet nearby, which I converted to a 2 gang and added this switch. The power for the range hood is drawn from the same line that the GFI is using which is a 20 amp circuit. The range hood instruction asks for a 15 or 20 amp circuit, so I figured it should be fine. (But given the quality of instructions, I am not so sure)

I could just bypass the switch anyway by "wire nutting". Then the switch will do nothing. Reminds me of a Rodney Dangerfield joke...
I had this switch which did nothing, so I would turn it on and off when I went by it. One day I got a phone call saying, "Knock it off".
Maybe it wasn't Rodney Dangerfield...at this age my memory fails me. I'll just tell the missus to not touch the switch!
 
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Old 08-18-11, 10:35 PM
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I hope you didnt tap off the sabc.:NO NO NO:
 
  #21  
Old 08-19-11, 09:20 AM
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It must be sabc since the outlet is a GFI on a countertop.
It's not too late, I can make changes before the drywall is put in.
I have a couple of options now that I can easily implement:
1) Tap from the lighting circuit.
2) An over the range microwave existed before the range hood. It's line is still available and I could use that. This was not a separate circuit, but pulled from the bathroom upstairs! Since the microwave is moving into a cabinet and needs it's own separate 20 amp circuit, I have put that circuit in.

Would either of these work? If not, what should I do?
 
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Old 08-19-11, 09:55 AM
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Your best bet is to take off the lighting circut. You should pull a new line for your microwave and disconnect it from the bathroom circut.
 
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Old 08-19-11, 10:13 AM
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As suggested pull a new line but I wouldn't install a disconnect.

An over the range microwave existed before the range hood. It's line is still available and I could use that. This was not a separate circuit, but pulled from the bathroom upstairs
That was not code compliant if the bath receptacle is on it. Probably not code compliant even if just lights. Just run a new 20a feed.
 
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Old 08-19-11, 01:13 PM
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Will do.
Yes, the old microwave line being tapped from the bathroom upstairs was not code. I capped it and tucked into an accessible junction box.
I guess there's no way the home inspector could have caught that when we were buying the home (unless he went around turning breakers off and looking for what was being cut off).
Actually, the outlet on the countertop next to the range was not GFCI. I just changed to one 2 days ago. This, the inspector should have noted.
 
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