Is this safe?


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Old 08-29-11, 12:37 PM
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Is this safe?

Per subject title…

I’m currently running a refrigerator and a freezer (both ~18cu-ft) off the same outlet.

AFAIK, it’s a standard 15A circuit (not 20A). It’s not a GFI circuit, which I consider an advantage for a Freezer application. Based on the manufacturer’s spec sticker on the inside of the appliances, the combined loading is 10.4A based on the following breakdown:

Fridge is rated to 6.4 A
Freezer is rated for 4A

Assumption is these aforementioned values are for continuous output when the compressor is running. When the units are idle, assumption is the current draw is nearly zero, yes? And… when the compressors kick on, the freezer and fridge may spike to 15A each, but only for under 10s, Yes?

Am I understanding correctly that there should be not issues with the setup? Thanks.
 
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Old 08-29-11, 01:00 PM
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There should not be any problem with this setup.
 
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Old 08-29-11, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Cavemanhead View Post
Assumption is these aforementioned values are for continuous output when the compressor is running. When the units are idle, assumption is the current draw is nearly zero, yes? And… when the compressors kick on, the freezer and fridge may spike to 15A each, but only for under 10s, Yes?
Circuit breakers are designed to handle a certain amount of inrush current. The compressors inrush would likely be less than 1 sec. As Ibpooks stated, all is fine.
 
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Old 08-31-11, 02:10 AM
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The only time there might be a problem is if both compressors started at exactly the same time. But circuit breakers will usually handle double their rated current for several seconds - long enough that even that would not be an issue.

Why no GFCI?
 
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Old 08-31-11, 06:27 PM
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Why no GFCI?
It doesnt need gfi because its not on the countertop.
 
 

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