Hot Tub Wiring

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  #1  
Old 09-04-11, 02:04 PM
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Hot Tub Wiring

I had a Hot tube given to me and was trying to figure out a way to get it hooked up. It came with a breaker box that has 220 and a 110 breaker, both which go to the hot tub. I have no manual for it and have been trying to locate one online. But the problem I'm having is figuring out the model of it, all I know at the moment is that it is a Tiger River Spa. The wire running from the spa to the breaker box (factory box) 220 is probably 8-10 gauge stranded wire by the looks of it, the 110 is 12 gauge solid.

The wire that was ran from their breaker box to spa breaker box looks to be 6/3 stranded wire. I'm amusing the 110 is for the lights in the spa and possibly the control panel. And the 220 for the heater/pumps. The 220 breaker is 30 amp and the 110 is 20 amp. I'm wanting to install the spa under my car port where I have a small building where I keep my water softener (building has 10/2 romex in conduit.) So I was thinking I would run the same kind of wire they ran from their breaker box to mine as well. The Main breaker box for my house to the breaker box of the spa is about ~60ft.

I found 75ft of 6/3 NM-B that I was thinking if I bought that, and ran it in conduit underground to my spa breaker box from my main breaker box. I'm not a professional electrician or anything, so I'm seeking advise from you guys. From what I've read 75ft of 6/3 would be fine at this distance. I'm just wanting to get some more opinions on the application so I don't end up blowing money on something that may not work. If all else fails I can just pour a pad around back of the house and put it there, but I would much rather it be in an enclosed area. And I'll end up spending more money on concrete then the wire itself. It would take around two yards of concrete to pour a 6in pad for it. That would cost around $250, being that $90/yd(3500 psi) and around $70 delivery fee since I wouldn't be ordering enough to cover that. So the cost is more to have it somewhere I'd rather not have it... The wire I was looking at is in the link below. Conduit is cheap so that really doesn't add much to the cost. Will this application work?


75 ft. 6/3 NM-B Wire-147-4203B9 at The Home Depot
 

Last edited by kennyy; 09-04-11 at 03:29 PM.
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  #2  
Old 09-04-11, 02:20 PM
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Type NM-b cable cannot be used in conduit that is buried or run outside. There are several other things that need to be addressed but I'll leave that to the professional electricians that work with this stuff everyday.
 
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Old 09-04-11, 02:48 PM
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In addition to what Furd has said (that I agree with), why would you want to pay the high price of NM-B just to put it in conduit? You would be better served to use type THWN or XHHW which can be used in conduit underground and it would be cheaper too. Makes no sense. I'll let the hot tub pros finish with the details on this one.
 
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Old 09-04-11, 03:22 PM
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Welcome to the forums. Please use paragraphs in future posts so they are easy to read.

You can not use cable of any kind outside for a spa. Code requires an insulated ground. Cable does not have an insulated ground. Nominal voltages used in single phase residential wiring are 120 volts and 240 volts.

Assuming the spa box is 240v only you could run a 4 wire circuit to a subpanel near the spa and derive 120v for a 120v convenience receptacle and 240v for the spa box. That would save running two sets of wires.

Suggest you forget trying to duplicate the previous power supply to the spa as you don't know if it was correct or not. Could you post some pictures of the breaker box on the spa. It may be able to be used for the spa and to derive 120v power for a convenience receptacle eliminating the need for the subpanel I mentioned above. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...your-post.html
 
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Old 09-04-11, 03:38 PM
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Here is the picture you requested.


I've been doing some more reading as well about the wiring. I'll make a trip to home depot and see if they carry 6AWG THWN. I'm all about making this cheap as possible as everyone would be, but safe at the same time. I'm not in city limits so I don't have to worry about inspections but I do want to be safe and it be done right. Thanks for the advise thus far everyone!
 
  #6  
Old 09-04-11, 05:55 PM
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You need a four-wire branch circuit from the service panel to the hot tub. This would consist of two "hot" conductors, a neutral conductor and an equipment ground conductor. All of the wires need to be insulated, the hots any color but white, grey or green; the neutral wire needs to be white and the equipment ground needs to be green. Remarking of insulation color is NOT allowed for the sizes needed.

The two hot wires go to the two lugs in the upper left area of the circuit breaker enclosure, the white to the neutral bus on the right side and the green to the equipment grounding bus at the lower right.

This four-wire circuit is a combined 240/120 volt circuit so only the one circuit is necessary.
 
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Old 09-04-11, 07:11 PM
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I found this website, it seems to dumb it down really nice for me

Wiring a Hot Tub - Electrical Installation and Wiring Diagrams
 
  #8  
Old 09-05-11, 06:58 AM
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Just a side note, just because you're outside city limits doesn't mean your town/municipality doesn't require permits/inspections. Nowadays all but the smallest and most rural municipalities do require them, either because of liability or a revenue source (depending on your viewpoint).

I'd hate to go through all the hassle and cost of installation only to find out that there's some law on the books about placement of hottubs in your area or something similar and have to move or remove it.
 
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Old 09-05-11, 07:22 AM
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Totally understandable, although I'm not even sure that this town even has an inspector lol. The population of the town I live in is probably around 1-2 thousand people and has one convenient store. I would be more than happy to get an inspection but I don't think this town even has one. I'll call town hall to make sure though.
 
  #10  
Old 09-05-11, 07:50 AM
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Your permitting and inspections may be done at the county or even state level. You should be able to ascertain this by calling your city hall or county administration offices.
 
  #11  
Old 09-05-11, 09:49 AM
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Before you pour the concrete you should understand the requirements for the bonding grid.
 
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